Family Communication and Adolescent Alcohol Use in Nicaragua, Central America: A Test of Primary Socialization Theory

Jonathan Pettigrew, YoungJu Shin, James B. Stein, Lisa J. Van Raalte

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Applying primary socialization theory to a sample of early adolescents from Nicaragua, this study examines direct and indirect associations between family bonding and adolescent alcohol use via substance specific prevention communication (SSPC) and adolescent efficacy. Early adolescents in 7th and 8th grades completed a self-report, cross-sectional survey. Structural equation modeling revealed that family expressiveness was significantly indirectly related to adolescent lifetime alcohol use through SSPC. Results are discussed in relation to primary socialization theory, family communication, and international substance use prevention efforts. This study provides supportive evidence for the important role of positive family communication as a protective factor for early adolescents in Nicaragua.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)33-48
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Family Communication
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Communication

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Family Communication and Adolescent Alcohol Use in Nicaragua, Central America: A Test of Primary Socialization Theory'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this