Family-centered care after acute myocardial infarction.

J. Fleury, S. M. Moore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The experience of a cardiac event is a significant source of stress for both patients and their family members. The acute phase after myocardial infarction reflects a crisis for patients and family members as they attempt to reconcile the affect of the event and adapt to the uncertainties associated with hospitalization and the initial recovery process. This article reviews empirical research available to cardiovascular nurses that may guide family-centered care during the acute phase after myocardial infarction. Directions for practice and research focus on cardiovascular nursing interventions that address family needs after an acute myocardial infarction. The experience of an acute myocardial infarction is a source of stress for both patients and their family members and may be viewed as a crisis that significantly disrupts family functioning and dynamics. The trajectory of cardiovascular disease involves multiple adjustments by patients and family members as they attempt to reconcile the affect of the event and adapt to the uncertainties associated with the acute phase of illness. Efforts by patients and family members to manage the stressors associated with the acute phase of cardiovascular illness are often associated with alterations in physiologic and psychologic functioning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)73-82
Number of pages10
JournalThe Journal of cardiovascular nursing
Volume13
Issue number3
StatePublished - Apr 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Myocardial Infarction
Uncertainty
Cardiovascular Nursing
Social Adjustment
Empirical Research
Family Relations
Hospitalization
Cardiovascular Diseases
Nurses
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Family-centered care after acute myocardial infarction. / Fleury, J.; Moore, S. M.

In: The Journal of cardiovascular nursing, Vol. 13, No. 3, 04.1999, p. 73-82.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{5237eda6b0c84135bad561ee86d05b32,
title = "Family-centered care after acute myocardial infarction.",
abstract = "The experience of a cardiac event is a significant source of stress for both patients and their family members. The acute phase after myocardial infarction reflects a crisis for patients and family members as they attempt to reconcile the affect of the event and adapt to the uncertainties associated with hospitalization and the initial recovery process. This article reviews empirical research available to cardiovascular nurses that may guide family-centered care during the acute phase after myocardial infarction. Directions for practice and research focus on cardiovascular nursing interventions that address family needs after an acute myocardial infarction. The experience of an acute myocardial infarction is a source of stress for both patients and their family members and may be viewed as a crisis that significantly disrupts family functioning and dynamics. The trajectory of cardiovascular disease involves multiple adjustments by patients and family members as they attempt to reconcile the affect of the event and adapt to the uncertainties associated with the acute phase of illness. Efforts by patients and family members to manage the stressors associated with the acute phase of cardiovascular illness are often associated with alterations in physiologic and psychologic functioning.",
author = "J. Fleury and Moore, {S. M.}",
year = "1999",
month = "4",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "13",
pages = "73--82",
journal = "Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing",
issn = "0889-4655",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Family-centered care after acute myocardial infarction.

AU - Fleury, J.

AU - Moore, S. M.

PY - 1999/4

Y1 - 1999/4

N2 - The experience of a cardiac event is a significant source of stress for both patients and their family members. The acute phase after myocardial infarction reflects a crisis for patients and family members as they attempt to reconcile the affect of the event and adapt to the uncertainties associated with hospitalization and the initial recovery process. This article reviews empirical research available to cardiovascular nurses that may guide family-centered care during the acute phase after myocardial infarction. Directions for practice and research focus on cardiovascular nursing interventions that address family needs after an acute myocardial infarction. The experience of an acute myocardial infarction is a source of stress for both patients and their family members and may be viewed as a crisis that significantly disrupts family functioning and dynamics. The trajectory of cardiovascular disease involves multiple adjustments by patients and family members as they attempt to reconcile the affect of the event and adapt to the uncertainties associated with the acute phase of illness. Efforts by patients and family members to manage the stressors associated with the acute phase of cardiovascular illness are often associated with alterations in physiologic and psychologic functioning.

AB - The experience of a cardiac event is a significant source of stress for both patients and their family members. The acute phase after myocardial infarction reflects a crisis for patients and family members as they attempt to reconcile the affect of the event and adapt to the uncertainties associated with hospitalization and the initial recovery process. This article reviews empirical research available to cardiovascular nurses that may guide family-centered care during the acute phase after myocardial infarction. Directions for practice and research focus on cardiovascular nursing interventions that address family needs after an acute myocardial infarction. The experience of an acute myocardial infarction is a source of stress for both patients and their family members and may be viewed as a crisis that significantly disrupts family functioning and dynamics. The trajectory of cardiovascular disease involves multiple adjustments by patients and family members as they attempt to reconcile the affect of the event and adapt to the uncertainties associated with the acute phase of illness. Efforts by patients and family members to manage the stressors associated with the acute phase of cardiovascular illness are often associated with alterations in physiologic and psychologic functioning.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0033110698&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0033110698&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 13

SP - 73

EP - 82

JO - Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing

JF - Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing

SN - 0889-4655

IS - 3

ER -