Failure to Address African Americans’ Spiritual Needs During Hospitalization: Identifying Predictors of Dissatisfaction Across the Arc of Service Provision

David Hodge, Robert J. Wolosin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Using a national sample of recently hospitalized older African Americans (N = 2,227), this study identified predictors of dissatisfaction with the manner in which clients’ spiritual needs were addressed during hospitalization. Of 8 major areas of service provision examined, 3 were significant predictors of dissatisfaction: nurses, physicians, and the discharge process. The findings underscore the importance of collaborative efforts to address elderly Black clients’ spiritual needs. Social workers, who frequently oversee the discharge process, can play an important role in addressing African Americans’ spiritual needs by developing discharge plans that incorporate clients’ spiritual strengths and resources into the planning process.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)190-205
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Gerontological Social Work
Volume58
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 17 2015

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • hospitals
  • religion
  • spiritual needs
  • spirituality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Nursing (miscellaneous)

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