Failure of budesonide in a pilot study of treatment-dependent autoimmune hepatitis

Albert J. Czaja, Keith D. Lindor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background & Aims: Budesonide has a high hepatic first-pass clearance and metabolites virtually devoid of glucocorticoid activity. Our goals were to assess budesonide in patients with treatment-dependent autoimmune hepatitis and to determine if efficacy and safety justified a controlled trial. Methods: Ten patients who were dependent on continuous treatment to prevent exacerbation of their disease were treated with budesonide, 3 mg thrice daily. Results: Laboratory indices did not improve significantly during 5 ±1 months of therapy (range, 2-12 months). Three patients entered clinical and biochemical remission; 2 of them achieved histologie remission. Seven patients either deteriorated during therapy or became drug intolerant. Withdrawal symptoms complicated conversion from prednisone to budesonide treatment, and every patient developed at least 1 side effect. Lumbar spine density decreased in 2 patients, and femur density decreased in 2 patients, including 1 with lumbar spine changes. However, mean bone densities actually increased slightly in the entire group. Conclusions: Budesonide therapy was associated with a low frequency of remission and high occurrence of treatment failure and side effects in treatment-dependent autoimmune hepatitis. Findings did not support the need for a controlled treatment trial in this select population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1312-1316
Number of pages5
JournalGastroenterology
Volume119
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000
Externally publishedYes

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Budesonide
Autoimmune Hepatitis
Therapeutics
Spine
Substance Withdrawal Syndrome
Prednisone
Treatment Failure
Bone Density
Femur
Glucocorticoids
Disease Progression
Safety
Liver

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Failure of budesonide in a pilot study of treatment-dependent autoimmune hepatitis. / Czaja, Albert J.; Lindor, Keith D.

In: Gastroenterology, Vol. 119, No. 5, 01.01.2000, p. 1312-1316.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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