Factors constraining the benefit to speech understanding of combining information from low-frequency hearing and a cochlear implant

Michael Dorman, Sarah Cook, Anthony Spahr, Ting Zhang, Louise Loiselle, David Schramm, JoAnne Whittingham, Rene Gifford

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Many studies have documented the benefits to speech understanding when cochlear implant (CI) patients can access low-frequency acoustic information from the ear opposite the implant. In this study we assessed the role of three factors in determining the magnitude of bimodal benefit - (i) the level of CI-only performance, (ii) the magnitude of the hearing loss in the ear with low-frequency acoustic hearing and (iii) the type of test material. The patients had low-frequency PTAs (average of 125, 250 and 500Hz) varying over a large range (<30dB HL to >70dB HL) in the ear contralateral to the implant. The patients were tested with (i) CNC words presented in quiet (. n=105) (ii) AzBio sentences presented in quiet (. n=102), (iii) AzBio sentences in noise at+10dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) (. n=69), and (iv) AzBio sentences at+5dB SNR (. n=64). We find maximum bimodal benefit when (i) CI scores are less than 60 percent correct, (ii) hearing loss is less than 60dB HL in low-frequencies and (iii) the test material is sentences presented against a noise background. When these criteria are met, some bimodal patients can gain 40-60 percentage points in performance relative to performance with a CI.This article is part of a Special Issue entitled <Lasker Award>.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)107-111
Number of pages5
JournalHearing Research
Volume322
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2015

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Cochlear Implants
Hearing
Ear
Signal-To-Noise Ratio
Hearing Loss
Acoustics
Noise
Hearing Tests

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sensory Systems

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Factors constraining the benefit to speech understanding of combining information from low-frequency hearing and a cochlear implant. / Dorman, Michael; Cook, Sarah; Spahr, Anthony; Zhang, Ting; Loiselle, Louise; Schramm, David; Whittingham, JoAnne; Gifford, Rene.

In: Hearing Research, Vol. 322, 01.04.2015, p. 107-111.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dorman, M, Cook, S, Spahr, A, Zhang, T, Loiselle, L, Schramm, D, Whittingham, J & Gifford, R 2015, 'Factors constraining the benefit to speech understanding of combining information from low-frequency hearing and a cochlear implant', Hearing Research, vol. 322, pp. 107-111. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2014.09.010
Dorman, Michael ; Cook, Sarah ; Spahr, Anthony ; Zhang, Ting ; Loiselle, Louise ; Schramm, David ; Whittingham, JoAnne ; Gifford, Rene. / Factors constraining the benefit to speech understanding of combining information from low-frequency hearing and a cochlear implant. In: Hearing Research. 2015 ; Vol. 322. pp. 107-111.
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