Factors associated with medication self-administration in children with asthma

Marilyn L. Winkelstein, Karen Huss, Arlene Butz, Peyton Eggleston, Perla Vargas, Cynthia Rand

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigated factors associated with early self- administration of inhaled asthma medications by minority children. Specifically, the study evaluated: (1) the reasons parents allow early administration of inhaled medications, (2) childhood activities associated with early medication administration, (3) parent's perception of the child's ability to use a metered-dose inhaler (MDI), (4) the child's actual ability to use an MDI, and (5) concordance/discordance between physician-parent reports and parent-child reports of asthma medications. Study results indicated that 93% of the children were taking inhaled asthma medications without adult supervision. Early self-administration of asthma medications was related to the parent's employment status and the performance of other childhood behaviors such as completion of homework independently and crossing the street alone. Only 7% of the children had effective MDI skills, but 60% of the parents rated their child's MDI skills as excellent. Twenty percent, 67%, and 50%, respectively, of the parents' reports of beta-agonists, daily inhaled steroids, and cromolyn were discordant with the physician's actual prescriptions. Sixty-two percent, 57%, and 79%, respectively, of the children's reports for inhaled beta-agonists, daily inhaled steroids, and cromolyn were discordant with their parents' reports. Implications for anticipatory guidance, future educational strategies, and supervision of MDI technique are provided.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)337-345
Number of pages9
JournalClinical Pediatrics
Volume39
Issue number6
StatePublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Self Administration
Metered Dose Inhalers
Asthma
Parents
Cromolyn Sodium
Aptitude
Steroids
Physicians
Prescriptions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Winkelstein, M. L., Huss, K., Butz, A., Eggleston, P., Vargas, P., & Rand, C. (2000). Factors associated with medication self-administration in children with asthma. Clinical Pediatrics, 39(6), 337-345.

Factors associated with medication self-administration in children with asthma. / Winkelstein, Marilyn L.; Huss, Karen; Butz, Arlene; Eggleston, Peyton; Vargas, Perla; Rand, Cynthia.

In: Clinical Pediatrics, Vol. 39, No. 6, 2000, p. 337-345.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Winkelstein, ML, Huss, K, Butz, A, Eggleston, P, Vargas, P & Rand, C 2000, 'Factors associated with medication self-administration in children with asthma', Clinical Pediatrics, vol. 39, no. 6, pp. 337-345.
Winkelstein ML, Huss K, Butz A, Eggleston P, Vargas P, Rand C. Factors associated with medication self-administration in children with asthma. Clinical Pediatrics. 2000;39(6):337-345.
Winkelstein, Marilyn L. ; Huss, Karen ; Butz, Arlene ; Eggleston, Peyton ; Vargas, Perla ; Rand, Cynthia. / Factors associated with medication self-administration in children with asthma. In: Clinical Pediatrics. 2000 ; Vol. 39, No. 6. pp. 337-345.
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