Factors Associated with Home Food Environment in Low-Income Overweight or Obese Pregnant Women

Mei Wei Chang, Chyongchiou J. Lin, Rebecca E. Lee, Duane T. Wegener

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Limited research has examined factors associated with home food availability. This study investigated the associations among demographics, body mass index category, stress, and home food availability among low-income overweight or obese pregnant women. This cross-sectional study enrolled 332 participants who were non-Hispanic black or white. We performed logistic regression modeling for unprocessed food, processed food, overall ultra-processed food, and three subcategories of ultra-processed food (salty snacks, sweet snacks and candies, and soda). Black women were less likely than white women to have large amounts of processed foods (OR = 0.56), salty snacks (OR = 0.61), and soda (OR = 0.49) available at home. Women with at least some college education or at least a college education were more likely to have large amounts of unprocessed food (OR = 2.58, OR = 4.38 respectively) but less likely to have large amounts of soda (OR = 0.44; OR = 0.22 respectively) available at home than their counterparts. Women with higher stress were less likely to have large amounts of unprocessed food available at home (OR = 0.58) than those with lower stress. Home food availability varied by race, education, and levels of stress in low-income overweight or obese pregnant women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number869
JournalNutrients
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2022
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Low-income
  • Obesity
  • Pregnant women
  • Stress
  • Ultra-processed foods

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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