Eye movements reveal fast, voice-specific priming

Megan H. Papesh, Stephen Goldinger, Michael C. Hout

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In spoken word perception, voice specificity effects are well-documented: When people hear repeated words in some task, performance is generally better when repeated items are presented in their originally heard voices, relative to changed voices. A key theoretical question about voice specificity effects concerns their time-course: Some studies suggest that episodic traces exert their influence late in lexical processing (the time-course hypothesis; McLennan & Luce, 2005), whereas others suggest that episodic traces influence immediate, online processing. We report 2 eye-tracking studies investigating the time-course of voice-specific priming within and across cognitive tasks. In Experiment 1, participants performed modified lexical decision or semantic classification to words spoken by 4 speakers. The tasks required participants to click a red "x" or a blue "+" located randomly within separate visual half-fields, necessitating trial-by-trial visual search with consistent half-field response mapping. After a break, participants completed a second block with new and repeated items, half spoken in changed voices. Voice effects were robust very early, appearing in saccade initiation times. Experiment 2 replicated this pattern while changing tasks across blocks, ruling out a response priming account. In the General Discussion, we address the time-course hypothesis, focusing on the challenge it presents for empirical disconfirmation, and highlighting the broad importance of indexical effects, beyond studies of priming.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)314-337
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology: General
Volume145
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

Fingerprint

Eye Movements
Saccades
Task Performance and Analysis
Priming
Visual Fields
Semantics
Time Course

Keywords

  • Exemplar models
  • Eye movements
  • Priming effects
  • Spoken word perception
  • Voice specificity effects

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Psychology(all)
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Eye movements reveal fast, voice-specific priming. / Papesh, Megan H.; Goldinger, Stephen; Hout, Michael C.

In: Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, Vol. 145, No. 3, 01.03.2016, p. 314-337.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Papesh, Megan H. ; Goldinger, Stephen ; Hout, Michael C. / Eye movements reveal fast, voice-specific priming. In: Journal of Experimental Psychology: General. 2016 ; Vol. 145, No. 3. pp. 314-337.
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