Externalizing Problems in Fifth Grade: Relations With Productive Activity, Maternal Sensitivity, and Harsh Parenting From Infancy Through Middle Childhood

Robert H. Bradley, Robert F. Corwyn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

75 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study used data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development's Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development to examine relations between parenting, self-control, and externalizing behavior from infancy through 5th grade. Results indicate that self-control measured during middle childhood mediates relations between maternal sensitivity, opportunity for productive activity, and parental harshness and both mother-reported and teacher-reported externalizing behavior. Results showed that parenting measured during middle childhood was more strongly related to 5th-grade externalizing behavior compared with parenting measured during infancy and early childhood. However, there was evidence that parenting during the preschool years was related to 5th-grade externalizing behavior through later parenting and self-control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1390-1401
Number of pages12
JournalDevelopmental psychology
Volume43
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • externalizing behavior
  • home environment
  • maternal sensitivity
  • parenting
  • self-control

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Demography
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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