Exploring the integration of thin-ideal internalization and self-objectification in the prevention of eating disorders

Ashley M. Kroon Van Diest, Marisol Perez La Mar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Analyses of thin-ideal internalization and self-objectification were conducted within the context of a cognitive dissonance based eating disorder prevention program implemented in an undergraduate sorority. Participants completed self-report assessments at baseline (n=177), post-intervention (n=169), 5-month (n=159), and 1-year follow-up (n=105). Cross-sectional path analysis indicated that thin-ideal internalization and self-objectification predict each other and both predict body dissatisfaction, which in turn, predicts eating disorder symptoms. A longitudinal examination conducted using hierarchical linear modeling indicated that participants showed significant reductions in thin-ideal internalization, self-objectification, body dissatisfaction, and eating disorder symptoms after participating in the prevention program. Reductions of symptoms were maintained 1-year post-intervention, with the exception of self-objectification, which was significantly reduced up to 5-months post-intervention. Collectively, results suggest that targeting both thin-ideal internalization and self-objectification simultaneously within eating disorder prevention programs could increase the reduction of eating disorder symptoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)16-25
Number of pages10
JournalBody Image
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cognitive Dissonance
Self Report
Cross-Sectional Studies
Feeding and Eating Disorders
Self-Assessment

Keywords

  • Body dissatisfaction
  • Eating disorders
  • Prevention
  • Self-objectification
  • Thin-ideal internalization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Applied Psychology
  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Exploring the integration of thin-ideal internalization and self-objectification in the prevention of eating disorders. / Kroon Van Diest, Ashley M.; Perez La Mar, Marisol.

In: Body Image, Vol. 10, No. 1, 01.2013, p. 16-25.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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