Exploring the deep-level reasoning questions effect during vicarious learning among eighth to eleventh graders in the domains of computer literacy and Newtonian physics

Barry Gholson, Amy Witherspoon, Brent Morgan, Joshua K. Brittingham, Robert Coles, Arthur C. Graesser, Jeremiah Sullins, Scotty D. Craig

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper tested the deep-level reasoning questions effect in the domains of computer literacy between eighth and tenth graders and Newtonian physics for ninth and eleventh graders. This effect claims that learning is facilitated when the materials are organized around questions that invite deep-reasoning. The literature indicates that vicarious learners in college student populations show greater pretest to posttest learning gains when presented with deep-level reasoning questions before each content sentence, than when deep-level questions are omitted, or when learners interact with an intelligent tutoring system. This effect holds for vicarious learners across grade levels and domains.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)487-493
Number of pages7
JournalInstructional Science
Volume37
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2009

Keywords

  • Computer literacy
  • Deep-level reasoning questions
  • Physics
  • Questions and learning
  • Randomized classroom research
  • Vicarious learning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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