Abstract

Online news, microblogs and other media documents all contain valuable insight regarding events and responses to events. Underlying these documents is the concept of framing, a process in which communicators act (consciously or unconsciously) to construct a point of view that encourages facts to be interpreted by others in a particular manner. As media discourse evolves, how topics and documents are framed can undergo change, shifting the discussion to different viewpoints or rhetoric. What causes these shifts can be difficult to determine directly; however, by linking secondary datasets and enabling visual exploration, we can enhance the hypothesis generation process. In this paper, we present a visual analytics framework for event cueing using media data. As discourse develops over time, our framework applies a time series intervention model which tests to see if the level of framing is different before or after a given date. If the model indicates that the times before and after are statistically significantly different, this cues an analyst to explore related datasets to help enhance their understanding of what (if any) events may have triggered these changes in discourse. Our framework consists of entity extraction and sentiment analysis as lenses for data exploration and uses two different models for intervention analysis. To demonstrate the usage of our framework, we present a case study on exploring potential relationships between climate change framing and conflicts in Africa.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number7192705
Pages (from-to)220-229
Number of pages10
JournalIEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 31 2016

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Climate change
Time series
Lenses

Keywords

  • Analytical models
  • Context
  • Lenses
  • Media
  • Meteorology
  • Time series analysis
  • Visual analytics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
  • Software
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Signal Processing

Cite this

Exploring Evolving Media Discourse Through Event Cueing. / Lu, Yafeng; Steptoe, Michael; Burke, Sarah; Wang, Hong; Tsai, Jiun Yi; Davulcu, Hasan; Montgomery, Douglas; Corman, Steven; Maciejewski, Ross.

In: IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics, Vol. 22, No. 1, 7192705, 31.01.2016, p. 220-229.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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