Explicitly teaching strategies, skills, and knowledge: Writing instruction in middle school classrooms

Susan De La Paz, Stephen Graham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

150 Scopus citations

Abstract

Writing is a very demanding task, requiring the orchestration of a variety of cognitive resources. For developing writers, it can be especially demanding, as they have not yet mastered important writing processes, skills, and knowledge involved in planning, drafting, and revising text. In the present study, middle school students were directly taught strategies that facilitated the execution of each of these processes. They were also taught the knowledge and skills needed to carry out these strategies. In comparison to peers in the control condition, students in the experimental treatment condition produced essays that were longer, contained more mature vocabulary, and were qualitatively better. These gains were evident immediately following instruction and on a short-term maintenance probe administered 1 month later.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)687-698
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Educational Psychology
Volume94
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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