Explaining the Sexuality Gap in Protest Participation

Eric Swank, Breanne Fahs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigated the relationship between sexual orientations and the protest actions of adults in the United States. Drawing from General Social Survey data from 1996 to 2004, we found that lesbians, gays, and bisexuals were more than twice as likely to protest as heterosexuals. To account for this sexuality gap, we used Patrick Egan’s (2008) political distinctiveness theories to identify possible underlying causes of these protesting differences. After running several regressions, we found that sexuality and protesting relationships were moderated by issues of educational attainment, marital statuses, metropolitan residencies, political partisanships, governmental grievances, and gender role expectations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-25
Number of pages25
JournalJournal of Homosexuality
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Dec 24 2017

Fingerprint

Sexuality
protest
sexuality
role expectation
participation
political theory
sexual orientation
marital status
gender role
Heterosexuality
Marital Status
Internship and Residency
Sexual Behavior
regression
cause
Sexual Minorities

Keywords

  • discrimination
  • essentialism
  • gays and lesbians
  • Protesting
  • social networks

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gender Studies
  • Social Psychology
  • Education
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Explaining the Sexuality Gap in Protest Participation. / Swank, Eric; Fahs, Breanne.

In: Journal of Homosexuality, 24.12.2017, p. 1-25.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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