Experiencing discrimination in Los Angeles: Latinos at the intersection of legal status and socioeconomic status

Nancy S. Landale, R. S. Oropesa, Aggie Noah

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Despite its recent slowdown, immigration from Latin America continues to be a controversial issue. Some scholars argue that the social climate is increasingly inhospitable to Latinos, potentially fueling discriminatory attitudes and behaviors. However, little research has examined Latinos' experiences with discrimination, especially variation by nativity and legal status. We address this issue with research on perceived discrimination among Mexican and Central American residents of Los Angeles County, a major destination for Latin American immigrants. Using data from the Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey and the American Community Survey, the analyses consider immigrants’ legal status, intersectionality, and competing perspectives on assimilation. The results show that undocumented immigrants do not report especially high levels of discrimination. Instead, young U.S.-born Latinos are the most likely to report mistreatment in interpersonal and institutional domains. Neighborhood ethnoracial and income diversity also have implications for perceived exposure to different types of discrimination.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)34-48
Number of pages15
JournalSocial Science Research
Volume67
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2017

Keywords

  • Discrimination
  • Immigrant
  • Latino
  • Legal status
  • Neighborhood diversity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Sociology and Political Science

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