Expanding the Direct and Indirect Effects Model of Writing (DIEW): Reading–Writing Relations, and Dynamic Relations as a Function of Measurement/Dimensions of Written Composition

Young Suk Grace Kim, Steve Graham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Within the context of the Direct and Indirect Effects Model of Writing (Kim & Park, 2019), we examined a dynamic relations hypothesis, which contends that the relations of component skills, including reading comprehension,to written composition vary as a function of dimensions of written composition. Specifically, we investigated (a) whether higher-order cognitive skills (i.e., inference, perspective taking, and monitoring) are differentially related to three dimensions of written composition—writing quality, writing productivity, and correctness in writing; (b) whether reading comprehension is differentially related to the three dimensions of written composition after accounting for oral language, cognition, and transcription skills, and whether reading comprehension mediates the relations of discourse oral language and lexical literacy to the three dimensions of written composition; and (c) whether total effects of oral language, cognition, transcription, and reading comprehension vary for the three dimensions of written composition. Structural equation model results from 350 English-speaking second graders showed that higher-order cognitive skills were differentially related to the three dimensions of written composition. Reading comprehension was related only to writing quality, but not to writing productivity or correctness in writing, and reading comprehension differentially mediated the relations of discourse oral language and lexical literacy to writing quality. Total effects of language, cognition, transcription, and reading comprehension varied largely for the three dimensions of written composition. These results support the dynamic relation hypothesis, role of reading in writing, and the importance of accounting for dimensions of written composition in a theoretical model of writing

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Educational Psychology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • Direct and Indirect Effects Model of Writing (DIEW)
  • higher-order cognitions
  • mediation
  • reading
  • writing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Expanding the Direct and Indirect Effects Model of Writing (DIEW): Reading–Writing Relations, and Dynamic Relations as a Function of Measurement/Dimensions of Written Composition'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this