Examining task priority effects in multi-task management

Robert S. Gutzwiller, Danielle M. Sitzman

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Strategic Task Overload Model (STOM) seeks to predict the choices of operators when they are confronted with multiple task options in an overloading situation. These situations characterize safety-critical incidents and work domains, such as a worker in a nuclear power plant or aircraft cockpit when multiple alarms sound, additional interruptions occur, and ongoing tasks must still be performed. Training and other safety considerations may instruct operators to "prioritize" certain tasks over others under these conditions, such as paying attention to the forward roadway while driving, instead of a passenger or a cell phone. However, priority may not exercise much power over the choice to switch tasks. Supporting prior data, the current experiment using a multi-task battery show priority instructions exerted no effect on the choice to switch task behavior; and in contrast to prior work, instructions also did not influence the time spent performing a prioritized task.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 2017 International Annual Meeting, HFES 2017
PublisherHuman Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc.
Pages762-766
Number of pages5
ISBN (Electronic)9780945289531
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017
Externally publishedYes
EventHuman Factors and Ergonomics Society 2017 International Annual Meeting, HFES 2017 - Austin, United States
Duration: Oct 9 2017Oct 13 2017

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Volume2017-October
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Other

OtherHuman Factors and Ergonomics Society 2017 International Annual Meeting, HFES 2017
CountryUnited States
CityAustin
Period10/9/1710/13/17

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

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