Evaluation of solid waste landfill performance during the Northridge Earthquake

Anthony J. Augello, Neven Matasovic, Jonathan D. Bray, Edward Kavazanjian, Raymond B. Seed

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

51 Scopus citations

Abstract

The lack of well documented case histories of landfill performance during earthquakes has made it difficult to calibrate our analytical tools and understanding of the earthquake resistance of these engineered structures. Moreover, it has not been possible to use case histories of landfill performance during earthquakes to demonstrate regulatory compliance. The 1994 Northridge earthquake provides an excellent opportunity to document the seismic performance of solid waste fills. In this paper, seven case records of landfill performance during the Northridge Earthquake are described. Back-analyses of the performance of four unlined and three geosynthetic-lined waste units are used to characterize the dynamic strength of the waste fill materials and geosynthetic liner interfaces. The results of these analyses indicate that the dynamic strength of waste fill is higher than the shear strength commonly assumed in static stability analyses and that the dynamic strengths of liner interfaces are generally consistent with values commonly used in practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationGeotechnical Special Publication
PublisherASCE
Pages17-50
Number of pages34
Edition54
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes
EventProceedings of the Geotechnical Engineering Division of the ASCE in Conjunction with the ASCE Convention - San Diego, CA, USA
Duration: Oct 23 1995Oct 27 1995

Other

OtherProceedings of the Geotechnical Engineering Division of the ASCE in Conjunction with the ASCE Convention
CitySan Diego, CA, USA
Period10/23/9510/27/95

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Soil Science
  • Building and Construction
  • Architecture

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