Evaluation of racial differences in resting and postprandial endothelial function in postmenopausal women matched for age, fitness and body composition

Damon L. Swift, Judith Y. Weltman, James T. Patrie, Eugene J. Barrett, Glenn A. Gaesser, Arthur Weltman

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: We investigated endothelial function at rest and after a high-fat meal challenge in African American (AA) and Caucasian postmenopausal women matched for age, body mass index, percent fat and fitness level. Design: Pilot study. Setting: University of Virginia General Clinical Research Center. Participants: Eight AA and 8 Caucasian postmenopausal women. Intervention: Participants underwent a VO2 peak treadmill protocol, percent fat assessment, and brachial artery flow-mediated dilation measurements (baseline and 4 hours following a high-fat meal). Main outcomes measures: Baseline and postprandial flow mediated dilation (FMD) following a high-fat meal. Results: FMD values were similar in AA (5.4%, 95% CI: 3.3, 7.4) and Caucasian women (4.0%, 95% CI: 2.0, 6.1). There was no significant change in FMD from baseline to four hours following the meal challenge within groups (AA:. 9%, P=.397, Caucasian: 2.3%, P=.063) or between groups (P=.449), despite a significant increase in triglycerides (AA: 81.8 mg/dL, P<.001, Caucasian: 99.7 mg/dL, P -.004). Conclusions: The present pilot study found that when postmenopausal AA and Caucasian women are matched for age, fitness and body composition, reported racial differences in resting endothelial function were not observed. Additionally, there were no racial differences in postprandial endothelial function or metabolism following a high-fat meal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)43-48
Number of pages6
JournalEthnicity and Disease
Volume23
Issue number1
StatePublished - Dec 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • African American
  • Endothelial function
  • Flow-mediated dilation
  • Postmenopausal
  • Postprandial
  • Racial differences

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

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