Evaluating teaching

Listening to students while acknowledging bias

Sue Steiner, Lynn C. Holley, Lynn Holley, Heather E. Campbell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite questions about their reliability and validity, student evaluations of teaching (SETs) are a primary measure of instructor performance. The current study examines SETs, including a thorough list of potentially relevant variables. The findings suggest that how much students perceive they learned in a course is an important predictor of SET scores. Further, a number of variables outside of the instructor's control appear to introduce bias into SETs. Nonetheless, social work norms imply the necessity of seeking input from students. Suggestions are given for possible methods of dealing with this dilemma, and for needed future research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)355-376
Number of pages22
JournalJournal of Social Work Education
Volume42
Issue number2
StatePublished - Mar 2006

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Teaching
student
evaluation
instructor
social work
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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Steiner, S., Holley, L. C., Holley, L., & Campbell, H. E. (2006). Evaluating teaching: Listening to students while acknowledging bias. Journal of Social Work Education, 42(2), 355-376.

Evaluating teaching : Listening to students while acknowledging bias. / Steiner, Sue; Holley, Lynn C.; Holley, Lynn; Campbell, Heather E.

In: Journal of Social Work Education, Vol. 42, No. 2, 03.2006, p. 355-376.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Steiner, S, Holley, LC, Holley, L & Campbell, HE 2006, 'Evaluating teaching: Listening to students while acknowledging bias', Journal of Social Work Education, vol. 42, no. 2, pp. 355-376.
Steiner, Sue ; Holley, Lynn C. ; Holley, Lynn ; Campbell, Heather E. / Evaluating teaching : Listening to students while acknowledging bias. In: Journal of Social Work Education. 2006 ; Vol. 42, No. 2. pp. 355-376.
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