Evaluating self-assessment and a placement examination for a first course in computer science: How do women and minority students fare?

Joseph Urban, Mary Anderson-Rowland, Faye Navabi, Debra Banks

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The recruitment of women and minority students to computer science undergraduate degree programs has not kept pace with other science and engineering disciplines. The introductory computer science course is a contributing factor to the poor retention rates for students in general and worse yet for women and minority students. There is interest in revamping the introductory computer science course for improving student effectiveness and retention. In the meantime, the approach of centering the introductory computer science course on an industrial strength language, such as C++ and Java, is considered by some as a factor contributing to the retention problems. This paper discusses the role of a placement examination as the means for advisement on entry to the first course in computing. A self-assessment part of the placement examination that was coupled with correct responses can be used to aid in early identification for advisement and course support.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings
StatePublished - 2006
Event113th Annual ASEE Conference and Exposition, 2006 - Chicago, IL, United States
Duration: Jun 18 2006Jun 21 2006

Other

Other113th Annual ASEE Conference and Exposition, 2006
CountryUnited States
CityChicago, IL
Period6/18/066/21/06

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Evaluating self-assessment and a placement examination for a first course in computer science: How do women and minority students fare?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Urban, J., Anderson-Rowland, M., Navabi, F., & Banks, D. (2006). Evaluating self-assessment and a placement examination for a first course in computer science: How do women and minority students fare? In ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings