Eugenics as Indian removal: Sociohistorical processes and the de(con)struction of American Indians in the Southeast

Angela Gonzales, Judy Kertész, Gabrielle Tayac

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although research on the history of the eugenics movement in the United States is legion, its impact on state policies that identified and defined American Indians has yet to be fully addressed. The exhibit, Our Lives: Contemporary Life and Identities (ongoing until September 21, 2014) at the National Museum of the American Indian provides a provocative vehicle for examining how eugenics-informed public policy during the first quarter of the twentieth century served to "remove" from official records Native peoples throughout the Southeast. One century after Indian Removal of the antebellum era, Native peoples in the American Southeast provide an important but often overlooked example of how racial policies, this time rooted in eugenics, effected a documentary erasure of Native peoples and communities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)53-67
Number of pages15
JournalPublic Historian
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Eugenics
North American Indians
Population Groups
Museums
Public Policy
History
Research
Native People
Southeast
American Indians

Keywords

  • American Indian
  • Eugenics
  • Identity
  • Indian, North America
  • Race
  • Scientific racism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • History
  • Conservation
  • Museology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Eugenics as Indian removal : Sociohistorical processes and the de(con)struction of American Indians in the Southeast. / Gonzales, Angela; Kertész, Judy; Tayac, Gabrielle.

In: Public Historian, Vol. 29, No. 3, 08.2007, p. 53-67.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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