Ethnocultural identity and induced abortion in Kazakstan

Victor Agadjanian, Zhenchao Qian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study analyzes ethnic differences in induced abortion among ever-married women in Kazakstan, drawing on data from the 1995 Kazakstan Demographic and Health Survey. Instead of conventional ethnic markers, such as "Kazak" or "Russian," it focuses on more complex ethnocultural identities that combine ascribed ethnicity with language use. Because of the history of russification in Kazakstan, three ethnocultural groups are defined and compared - Kazak women who chose to be interviewed in Kazak, Kazak women who chose to be interviewed in Russian, and women of European background interviewed in Russian. Whereas women of European origin were the most likely to undergo induced abortion, the Russian-interviewed Kazaks had higher abortion ratios and were more likely to terminate their pregnancies than were the Kazak-interviewed Kazaks, net of other characteristics. The implications of the results for induced abortion trends and family planning policy in Kazakstan are discussed in addition to other findings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)317-329
Number of pages13
JournalStudies in Family Planning
Volume28
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1997

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Demography
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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