Estimating urban PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations, based on synergistic MERIS/AATSR aerosol observations, land cover and morphology data

Anton Beloconi, Yiannis Kamarianakis, Nektarios Chrysoulakis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study evaluates alternative spatio-temporal approaches for quantitative estimation of daily mean Particulate Matter (PM) concentrations. Both fine (PM2.5) and coarse (PM10) concentrations were estimated over the area of London (UK) for the 2002-2012 time period, using Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) derived from MERIS (Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer)/AATSR (Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer) synergistic observations at 1. km. ×. 1 km resolution. Relative humidity, temperature and the K-Index obtained from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) sensor were used as additional predictors. High-resolution (100. m. ×. 100. m) local urban land cover and morphology datasets were incorporated in the analysis in order to capture the effects of local scale emissions and sequestration. Spatial (2-D) and spatio-temporal (3-D) kriging were applied to in situ urban PM measurements to investigate their association with satellite-derived AOT while accounting for differences in spatial support. Linear mixed-effects models with day-specific and site-specific random intercepts and slopes were estimated to associate satellite-derived products with kriged PM concentration and their predictive performance was evaluated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)148-164
Number of pages17
JournalRemote Sensing of Environment
Volume172
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Keywords

  • Aerosol optical thickness
  • Block kriging
  • Change of support problem
  • MERIS/AATSR synergy
  • Mixed-effects models
  • Particulate matter

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computers in Earth Sciences
  • Soil Science
  • Geology

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