Estimating residential energy consumption in metropolitan areas: A microsimulation approach

Wenwen Zhang, Caleb Robinson, Subhrajit Guhathakurta, Venu M. Garikapati, Bistra Dilkina, Marilyn A. Brown, Ram Pendyala

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Prior research has shown that land use patterns and the spatial configurations of cities have a significant impact on residential energy demand. Given the pressing issues surrounding energy security and climate change, there is renewed interest in developing and retrofitting cities to make them more energy efficient. Yet deriving micro-scale residential energy footprints of metropolitan areas is challenging because high resolution data from energy providers is generally unavailable. In this study, a bottom-up model is proposed to estimate residential energy demand using datasets that are commonly available in the United States. The model applies novel machine learning methods to match records in the Residential Energy Consumption Survey with Public Use Microdata samples. This matching and machine learning produce a synthetic household energy distribution at a neighborhood scale. The model was tested and validated with data from the Atlanta metropolitan region to demonstrate its application and promise.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)162-173
Number of pages12
JournalEnergy
Volume155
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 15 2018

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Energy utilization
Learning systems
Energy security
Retrofitting
Land use
Climate change

Keywords

  • Data synthesis
  • Machine learning
  • Residential energy consumption
  • Statistical matching

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Building and Construction
  • Pollution
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Zhang, W., Robinson, C., Guhathakurta, S., Garikapati, V. M., Dilkina, B., Brown, M. A., & Pendyala, R. (2018). Estimating residential energy consumption in metropolitan areas: A microsimulation approach. Energy, 155, 162-173. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.energy.2018.04.161

Estimating residential energy consumption in metropolitan areas : A microsimulation approach. / Zhang, Wenwen; Robinson, Caleb; Guhathakurta, Subhrajit; Garikapati, Venu M.; Dilkina, Bistra; Brown, Marilyn A.; Pendyala, Ram.

In: Energy, Vol. 155, 15.07.2018, p. 162-173.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zhang, W, Robinson, C, Guhathakurta, S, Garikapati, VM, Dilkina, B, Brown, MA & Pendyala, R 2018, 'Estimating residential energy consumption in metropolitan areas: A microsimulation approach', Energy, vol. 155, pp. 162-173. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.energy.2018.04.161
Zhang W, Robinson C, Guhathakurta S, Garikapati VM, Dilkina B, Brown MA et al. Estimating residential energy consumption in metropolitan areas: A microsimulation approach. Energy. 2018 Jul 15;155:162-173. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.energy.2018.04.161
Zhang, Wenwen ; Robinson, Caleb ; Guhathakurta, Subhrajit ; Garikapati, Venu M. ; Dilkina, Bistra ; Brown, Marilyn A. ; Pendyala, Ram. / Estimating residential energy consumption in metropolitan areas : A microsimulation approach. In: Energy. 2018 ; Vol. 155. pp. 162-173.
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