Equine facilitated psychotherapy

A pilot study of effect on posttraumatic stress symptoms in maltreated youth

Leslie Mccullough, Christina Risley-Curtiss, John Rorke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chronic maltreatment of children can provoke a host of neuropsychological and physiological anomalies that manifest as developmental, emotional, behavioral, cognitive, and psychosocial disorders and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Considering the multidimensional landscape of trauma and PTSD alongside the nonverbal and symbolic language of children, a nondidactic, somatic treatment intervention that engages the body’s own inner communication system seems well suited for young victims of maltreatment. The authors describe the results of a pilot study utilizing equine facilitated psychotherapy (EFP), an experiential, cognitive-behavioral based intervention, for the treatment of PTSD symptoms of maltreated youth. A purposive sample of 11 youth ages 10–18 who presented with PTSD symptomatology participated in eight weekly EFP outpatient sessions 1.5 to 2 hours in length. Pre and post, as well as midpoint, tests were administered. Results suggest the EFP treatment effects are multimodal, working in multiple directions at the same time. Results also suggest that the EFP model may be a viable psychotherapy for traumatized youth suffering PTSD symptomatology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)158-173
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Infant, Child, and Adolescent Psychotherapy
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
Psychotherapy
Horses
Child Language
Combined Modality Therapy
Child Abuse
Cognitive Therapy
Outpatients
Communication
Wounds and Injuries
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Equine facilitated psychotherapy : A pilot study of effect on posttraumatic stress symptoms in maltreated youth. / Mccullough, Leslie; Risley-Curtiss, Christina; Rorke, John.

In: Journal of Infant, Child, and Adolescent Psychotherapy, Vol. 14, No. 2, 01.01.2015, p. 158-173.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{918b7cbc991c441287f2bb2407ee941f,
title = "Equine facilitated psychotherapy: A pilot study of effect on posttraumatic stress symptoms in maltreated youth",
abstract = "Chronic maltreatment of children can provoke a host of neuropsychological and physiological anomalies that manifest as developmental, emotional, behavioral, cognitive, and psychosocial disorders and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Considering the multidimensional landscape of trauma and PTSD alongside the nonverbal and symbolic language of children, a nondidactic, somatic treatment intervention that engages the body’s own inner communication system seems well suited for young victims of maltreatment. The authors describe the results of a pilot study utilizing equine facilitated psychotherapy (EFP), an experiential, cognitive-behavioral based intervention, for the treatment of PTSD symptoms of maltreated youth. A purposive sample of 11 youth ages 10–18 who presented with PTSD symptomatology participated in eight weekly EFP outpatient sessions 1.5 to 2 hours in length. Pre and post, as well as midpoint, tests were administered. Results suggest the EFP treatment effects are multimodal, working in multiple directions at the same time. Results also suggest that the EFP model may be a viable psychotherapy for traumatized youth suffering PTSD symptomatology.",
author = "Leslie Mccullough and Christina Risley-Curtiss and John Rorke",
year = "2015",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/15289168.2015.1021658",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "14",
pages = "158--173",
journal = "Journal of Infant, Child, and Adolescent Psychotherapy",
issn = "1528-9168",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Equine facilitated psychotherapy

T2 - A pilot study of effect on posttraumatic stress symptoms in maltreated youth

AU - Mccullough, Leslie

AU - Risley-Curtiss, Christina

AU - Rorke, John

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - Chronic maltreatment of children can provoke a host of neuropsychological and physiological anomalies that manifest as developmental, emotional, behavioral, cognitive, and psychosocial disorders and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Considering the multidimensional landscape of trauma and PTSD alongside the nonverbal and symbolic language of children, a nondidactic, somatic treatment intervention that engages the body’s own inner communication system seems well suited for young victims of maltreatment. The authors describe the results of a pilot study utilizing equine facilitated psychotherapy (EFP), an experiential, cognitive-behavioral based intervention, for the treatment of PTSD symptoms of maltreated youth. A purposive sample of 11 youth ages 10–18 who presented with PTSD symptomatology participated in eight weekly EFP outpatient sessions 1.5 to 2 hours in length. Pre and post, as well as midpoint, tests were administered. Results suggest the EFP treatment effects are multimodal, working in multiple directions at the same time. Results also suggest that the EFP model may be a viable psychotherapy for traumatized youth suffering PTSD symptomatology.

AB - Chronic maltreatment of children can provoke a host of neuropsychological and physiological anomalies that manifest as developmental, emotional, behavioral, cognitive, and psychosocial disorders and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Considering the multidimensional landscape of trauma and PTSD alongside the nonverbal and symbolic language of children, a nondidactic, somatic treatment intervention that engages the body’s own inner communication system seems well suited for young victims of maltreatment. The authors describe the results of a pilot study utilizing equine facilitated psychotherapy (EFP), an experiential, cognitive-behavioral based intervention, for the treatment of PTSD symptoms of maltreated youth. A purposive sample of 11 youth ages 10–18 who presented with PTSD symptomatology participated in eight weekly EFP outpatient sessions 1.5 to 2 hours in length. Pre and post, as well as midpoint, tests were administered. Results suggest the EFP treatment effects are multimodal, working in multiple directions at the same time. Results also suggest that the EFP model may be a viable psychotherapy for traumatized youth suffering PTSD symptomatology.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84944451916&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84944451916&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/15289168.2015.1021658

DO - 10.1080/15289168.2015.1021658

M3 - Article

VL - 14

SP - 158

EP - 173

JO - Journal of Infant, Child, and Adolescent Psychotherapy

JF - Journal of Infant, Child, and Adolescent Psychotherapy

SN - 1528-9168

IS - 2

ER -