Equilibrium and non-equilibrium type β-relaxations

D-sorbitol versus o-terphenyl

Hermann Wagner, Ranko Richert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

174 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A previous observation, which indicated that the β-relaxation intensity of o-terphenyl is sensitive to the thermal history, is substantiated by dielectric relaxation experiments. Unlike the β-processes of other materials, only the quenched glassy state of o-terphenyl displays this secondary relaxation feature. The β-intensity is observed to decay gradually upon annealing and disappears altogether in the equilibrium liquid state at T > Tg. We compare the case of o-terphenyl with the concomitant signatures of D-sorbitol, which represents the more typical case of a glass-former which exhibits the slow β-process also in the liquid state including the α-β-merging scenario. We also present data of this α-β-merging for D-sorbitol confined to pores of 5 nm diameter, indicating that no longer-ranged correlations are involved in the secondary process.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4071-4077
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Physical Chemistry B
Volume103
Issue number20
StatePublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

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terphenyls
Sorbitol
Merging
Dielectric relaxation
Liquids
Annealing
liquids
Glass
signatures
histories
porosity
annealing
glass
Experiments
decay
Hot Temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

Cite this

Equilibrium and non-equilibrium type β-relaxations : D-sorbitol versus o-terphenyl. / Wagner, Hermann; Richert, Ranko.

In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, Vol. 103, No. 20, 1999, p. 4071-4077.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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