Epsilon carbide: A low-temperature component of interplanetary dust particles

Roy Christoffersen, P R Buseck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Transmission electron microscope study of a chondritic interplanetary dust particle has revealed the presence of epsilon iron-nickel carbide, a low-temperature carbide previously encountered only in metallurgical studies. In these studies ε-carbide was synthesized by carburization of iron or nickel grains in a stream of carbon monoxide or carbon monoxide plus hydrogen. Similar carburization of an iron-nickel metal in situ may have produced ε-carbide during particle heating on atmospheric entry or in solar orbit. Alternatively, the c-carbide may be a by-product of Fischer-Tropsch reactions in the solar nebula. Such reactions have been proposed as the mechanism of hydrocarbon formation in the early solar system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1327-1329
Number of pages3
JournalScience
Volume222
Issue number4630
StatePublished - 1983

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interplanetary dust
carbides
nickel
iron
carbon monoxide
atmospheric entry
solar orbits
solar nebula
solar system
hydrocarbons
electron microscopes
heating
hydrogen
metals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Epsilon carbide : A low-temperature component of interplanetary dust particles. / Christoffersen, Roy; Buseck, P R.

In: Science, Vol. 222, No. 4630, 1983, p. 1327-1329.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Christoffersen, Roy ; Buseck, P R. / Epsilon carbide : A low-temperature component of interplanetary dust particles. In: Science. 1983 ; Vol. 222, No. 4630. pp. 1327-1329.
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