Epidemic response coordination networks in “living documents”

Chan Wang, Yushim Kim, Seong Soo Oh

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Response plans developed thoroughly are suggestive of a successful action, but there is a gap in the literature with respect to the way concerted efforts among organizations are planned and change during crises. Using organizational network data extracted from the South Korean government's MERS response manuals, we examined the changes in the response coordination network planned during the epidemic's distinct stages. The greatest difference in predicting tie formation was found in the networks planned before the event and revised during the outbreak. Local and governmental actors tend to form more ties consistently in the revised manuals. Two actors that are intended to transfer medical and/or personnel resources tend to form more ties across all stages. These findings suggest that transferring material and/or human resources are key activities in the epidemic response and planners tend to increase the connection of local and governmental actors over time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 53rd Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2020
EditorsTung X. Bui
PublisherIEEE Computer Society
Pages594-603
Number of pages10
ISBN (Electronic)9780998133133
StatePublished - 2020
Externally publishedYes
Event53rd Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2020 - Maui, United States
Duration: Jan 7 2020Jan 10 2020

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences
Volume2020-January
ISSN (Print)1530-1605

Conference

Conference53rd Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2020
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityMaui
Period1/7/201/10/20

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Epidemic response coordination networks in “living documents”'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this