Envisioning human-robot coordination in future operations

David D. Woods, James Tittle, Magnus Feil, Axel Roesler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

131 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Developers of autonomous capabilities underestimate the need for coordination with human team members when their automata are deployed into complex operational settings. Automata are brittle as literal minded agents and there is a basic asymmetry in coordinative competencies between people and automata. The new capabilities of robotic systems raise new questions about how to support coordination. This paper presents a series of issues that demand innovation to achieve human-robot coordination (HRC). These include supporting people in their roles as problem holder and as robotic handler, overcoming ambiguities in remote perception, avoiding coordination surprises by better tools to see into future robotic activities and contingencies, and responsibility in human-robot teams.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)210-218
Number of pages9
JournalIEEE Transactions on Systems, Man and Cybernetics Part C: Applications and Reviews
Volume34
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Robotics
Robots
Innovation

Keywords

  • Affordances
  • Design methods
  • Human-automation interaction
  • Human-robot-interaction
  • Presence
  • Remote perception

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Computational Theory and Mathematics

Cite this

Envisioning human-robot coordination in future operations. / Woods, David D.; Tittle, James; Feil, Magnus; Roesler, Axel.

In: IEEE Transactions on Systems, Man and Cybernetics Part C: Applications and Reviews, Vol. 34, No. 2, 05.2004, p. 210-218.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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