Environmental justice

A panoptic overview using scientometrics

Jake R. Nelson, Anthony Grubesic

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Since its initial introduction in the 1970s, the field of environmental justice (EJ) continues to grow, with significant contributions from the disciplines of sustainability science, geography, political science, public policy and administration, urban planning, law, and many others. Each of these disciplines approach EJ research from slightly different perspectives, but all offer unique and valuable insight to the EJ knowledge domain. Although the interdisciplinary nature of environmental justice should be viewed as a strength, it presents a challenge when attempting to both summarize and synthesize key contributions to the field, due to disciplinary bias, narrow subfield foci, or gaps in knowledge by a research team without a representative disciplinary composition. The purpose of this paper is to provide a succinct, panoptic review of key research contributions to environmental justice, while simultaneously minimizing common problems associated with traditional reviews. In particular, this paper explores the utility of co-citation network analysis, to provide insight into the most important subdomains of environmental justice research. The results suggest that while early EJ research is initially focused on environmental disamenities and a continued focus on race and inequality, the research gradually shifts to foci more concerned with environmental amenities, such as parks and greenspace. We also find that race and inequality remain an important and consist line of research over the duration of the study time period. Implications for environmental justice research and its allied subfields are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1022
JournalSustainability (Switzerland)
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 30 2018

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environmental justice
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greenspace
Public administration
political geography
Time and motion study
Urban planning
network analysis
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Electric network analysis
urban planning
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Keywords

  • Citation analysis
  • Co-citation network
  • Environmental injustice
  • Environmental justice

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Cite this

Environmental justice : A panoptic overview using scientometrics. / Nelson, Jake R.; Grubesic, Anthony.

In: Sustainability (Switzerland), Vol. 10, No. 4, 1022, 30.03.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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