Environmental influences, physical activity, and weight status in 8- to 16-year-olds

Marsha Dowda, Barbara Ainsworth, Cheryl L. Addy, Ruth Saunders, William Riner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

173 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To assess the association between vigorous physical activity, participation on sport teams and in exercise programs, television watching, family environment, and weight status in youth. Design: Cross-sectional data from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Participants: A group of 2791 youth between the ages of 8 and 16 years who were enrolled in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Main Outcome Measures: Overweight was defined using age- and sex-specific 85th percentile of body mass index using Center for Disease Control and Prevention growth charts. Results: Both males and females who had an overweight mother and or father were more likely to be overweight compared with youth who did not have an overweight parent. Females who watched 4 or more hours of television were more likely to be overweight than those who watched less than 4 hours. Males and 14- to 16-year-old females who participated in sport team and exercise programs were less likely to be overweight than their counterparts who did not participate. Also, females with larger families and males from families with higher family incomes were less likely to be overweight. Conclusions: These results suggest that family environment is associated with overweight in youth and that sport and exercise program participants are less like to be overweight and that, for females, increased television watching is related to overweight.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)711-717
Number of pages7
JournalArchives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine
Volume155
Issue number6
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Exercise
Weights and Measures
Television
Nutrition Surveys
Sports
Growth Charts
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Fathers
Body Mass Index
Mothers
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Dowda, M., Ainsworth, B., Addy, C. L., Saunders, R., & Riner, W. (2001). Environmental influences, physical activity, and weight status in 8- to 16-year-olds. Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, 155(6), 711-717.

Environmental influences, physical activity, and weight status in 8- to 16-year-olds. / Dowda, Marsha; Ainsworth, Barbara; Addy, Cheryl L.; Saunders, Ruth; Riner, William.

In: Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Vol. 155, No. 6, 2001, p. 711-717.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dowda, M, Ainsworth, B, Addy, CL, Saunders, R & Riner, W 2001, 'Environmental influences, physical activity, and weight status in 8- to 16-year-olds', Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, vol. 155, no. 6, pp. 711-717.
Dowda, Marsha ; Ainsworth, Barbara ; Addy, Cheryl L. ; Saunders, Ruth ; Riner, William. / Environmental influences, physical activity, and weight status in 8- to 16-year-olds. In: Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine. 2001 ; Vol. 155, No. 6. pp. 711-717.
@article{f85a3b7dedd14e79b4cdaa757b4b2237,
title = "Environmental influences, physical activity, and weight status in 8- to 16-year-olds",
abstract = "Objective: To assess the association between vigorous physical activity, participation on sport teams and in exercise programs, television watching, family environment, and weight status in youth. Design: Cross-sectional data from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Participants: A group of 2791 youth between the ages of 8 and 16 years who were enrolled in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Main Outcome Measures: Overweight was defined using age- and sex-specific 85th percentile of body mass index using Center for Disease Control and Prevention growth charts. Results: Both males and females who had an overweight mother and or father were more likely to be overweight compared with youth who did not have an overweight parent. Females who watched 4 or more hours of television were more likely to be overweight than those who watched less than 4 hours. Males and 14- to 16-year-old females who participated in sport team and exercise programs were less likely to be overweight than their counterparts who did not participate. Also, females with larger families and males from families with higher family incomes were less likely to be overweight. Conclusions: These results suggest that family environment is associated with overweight in youth and that sport and exercise program participants are less like to be overweight and that, for females, increased television watching is related to overweight.",
author = "Marsha Dowda and Barbara Ainsworth and Addy, {Cheryl L.} and Ruth Saunders and William Riner",
year = "2001",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "155",
pages = "711--717",
journal = "JAMA Pediatrics",
issn = "2168-6203",
publisher = "American Medical Association",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Environmental influences, physical activity, and weight status in 8- to 16-year-olds

AU - Dowda, Marsha

AU - Ainsworth, Barbara

AU - Addy, Cheryl L.

AU - Saunders, Ruth

AU - Riner, William

PY - 2001

Y1 - 2001

N2 - Objective: To assess the association between vigorous physical activity, participation on sport teams and in exercise programs, television watching, family environment, and weight status in youth. Design: Cross-sectional data from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Participants: A group of 2791 youth between the ages of 8 and 16 years who were enrolled in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Main Outcome Measures: Overweight was defined using age- and sex-specific 85th percentile of body mass index using Center for Disease Control and Prevention growth charts. Results: Both males and females who had an overweight mother and or father were more likely to be overweight compared with youth who did not have an overweight parent. Females who watched 4 or more hours of television were more likely to be overweight than those who watched less than 4 hours. Males and 14- to 16-year-old females who participated in sport team and exercise programs were less likely to be overweight than their counterparts who did not participate. Also, females with larger families and males from families with higher family incomes were less likely to be overweight. Conclusions: These results suggest that family environment is associated with overweight in youth and that sport and exercise program participants are less like to be overweight and that, for females, increased television watching is related to overweight.

AB - Objective: To assess the association between vigorous physical activity, participation on sport teams and in exercise programs, television watching, family environment, and weight status in youth. Design: Cross-sectional data from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Participants: A group of 2791 youth between the ages of 8 and 16 years who were enrolled in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Main Outcome Measures: Overweight was defined using age- and sex-specific 85th percentile of body mass index using Center for Disease Control and Prevention growth charts. Results: Both males and females who had an overweight mother and or father were more likely to be overweight compared with youth who did not have an overweight parent. Females who watched 4 or more hours of television were more likely to be overweight than those who watched less than 4 hours. Males and 14- to 16-year-old females who participated in sport team and exercise programs were less likely to be overweight than their counterparts who did not participate. Also, females with larger families and males from families with higher family incomes were less likely to be overweight. Conclusions: These results suggest that family environment is associated with overweight in youth and that sport and exercise program participants are less like to be overweight and that, for females, increased television watching is related to overweight.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0035010144&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0035010144&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 11386963

AN - SCOPUS:0035010144

VL - 155

SP - 711

EP - 717

JO - JAMA Pediatrics

JF - JAMA Pediatrics

SN - 2168-6203

IS - 6

ER -