Enhancing daily affect in youth experiencing high-conflict parental divorce: A multiple baseline trial of an online prevention program

Karey L. O′Hara, Jesse L. Boring, Irwin N. Sandler, Connie J. Beck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study investigated the effects of a highly interactive, online cognitive-behavioral youth coping program: Children of Divorce-Coping with Divorce (CoD-CoD; Boring et al., 2015) on children exposed to high levels of interparental conflict (IPC). A multiple-baseline experimental design (N = 9) evaluated within-subject intervention effects on change in daily positive and negative affect before, during, and after the intervention (nobservations = 462). Participants were youth ages 11–16 who reported high exposure to IPC and whose parents had filed for divorce or parenting plan determinations in the prior year. A significant interaction effect indicated change in positive affect, but not negative affect, between the intervention and baseline phases. Positive affect linearly decreased during the baseline phase and flattened during the intervention phase. Results indicate that CoD-CoD was effective in interrupting a decline in youth-reported positive affect in a high-IPC sample, which may indicate a buffering effect against depression. Critical future directions include conducting large-scale randomized trials with children from high-IPC families to assess for whom the program is effective and assess long-term effects across a broad range of important outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalFamily Court Review
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • child mental health
  • coping
  • interparental conflict
  • parental divorce
  • prevention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Law

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