Gener(iz)ando el espacio: La cultura ballroom y la práctica espacial de la posibilidad en Detroit

Translated title of the contribution: Engendering space: Ballroom culture and the spatial practice of possibility in Detroit

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article examines the ways in which Black lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) members of the Ballroom community create black queer space to contend with their spatial exclusion from and marginalization within public and private space in urban Detroit, Michigan. Existing in most urban centers throughout North America, Ballroom culture is a community and network of Black and Latina/o LGBT people. In this ethnography, I delineate the multiple functions of two mutually constitutive domains of Ballroom culture, kinship (the houses) and ritualized performance (the ball events). I use queer theories of geography and draw from Sonjah Stanley Niaah's notion of performance geography to examine the generative socio-spatial practices that Ballroom members deploy to forge alternative possibilities for Black LGBT life in Detroit. In many ways, members of the Ballroom community work to challenge and undo the alienating and oppressive realities of built environments in urban centers by undertaking the necessary social and performance labor that allow its members to revise and reconfigure exclusionary and oppressive spatial forms.

Original languageSpanish
Pages (from-to)489-507
Number of pages19
JournalGender, Place & Culture
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

geography
performance
community work
kinship
ethnography
community
exclusion
labor
Detroit
Ballroom
event
Bisexual
Lesbian
Geography
queer theory
Queer Theory
Labor
Marginalization
Kinship
Latinas

Keywords

  • black queer space
  • kinship
  • performance ethnography
  • performance geography
  • socio-spatial practices
  • spatial marginalization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gender Studies
  • Cultural Studies
  • Demography
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Gener(iz)ando el espacio : La cultura ballroom y la práctica espacial de la posibilidad en Detroit. / Bailey, Marlon.

In: Gender, Place & Culture, Vol. 21, No. 4, 2014, p. 489-507.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{09839402f7f6494281877ab177f05bf6,
title = "Gener(iz)ando el espacio: La cultura ballroom y la pr{\'a}ctica espacial de la posibilidad en Detroit",
abstract = "This article examines the ways in which Black lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) members of the Ballroom community create black queer space to contend with their spatial exclusion from and marginalization within public and private space in urban Detroit, Michigan. Existing in most urban centers throughout North America, Ballroom culture is a community and network of Black and Latina/o LGBT people. In this ethnography, I delineate the multiple functions of two mutually constitutive domains of Ballroom culture, kinship (the houses) and ritualized performance (the ball events). I use queer theories of geography and draw from Sonjah Stanley Niaah's notion of performance geography to examine the generative socio-spatial practices that Ballroom members deploy to forge alternative possibilities for Black LGBT life in Detroit. In many ways, members of the Ballroom community work to challenge and undo the alienating and oppressive realities of built environments in urban centers by undertaking the necessary social and performance labor that allow its members to revise and reconfigure exclusionary and oppressive spatial forms.",
keywords = "black queer space, kinship, performance ethnography, performance geography, socio-spatial practices, spatial marginalization",
author = "Marlon Bailey",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1080/0966369X.2013.786688",
language = "Spanish",
volume = "21",
pages = "489--507",
journal = "Gender, Place, and Culture",
issn = "0966-369X",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Gener(iz)ando el espacio

T2 - La cultura ballroom y la práctica espacial de la posibilidad en Detroit

AU - Bailey, Marlon

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - This article examines the ways in which Black lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) members of the Ballroom community create black queer space to contend with their spatial exclusion from and marginalization within public and private space in urban Detroit, Michigan. Existing in most urban centers throughout North America, Ballroom culture is a community and network of Black and Latina/o LGBT people. In this ethnography, I delineate the multiple functions of two mutually constitutive domains of Ballroom culture, kinship (the houses) and ritualized performance (the ball events). I use queer theories of geography and draw from Sonjah Stanley Niaah's notion of performance geography to examine the generative socio-spatial practices that Ballroom members deploy to forge alternative possibilities for Black LGBT life in Detroit. In many ways, members of the Ballroom community work to challenge and undo the alienating and oppressive realities of built environments in urban centers by undertaking the necessary social and performance labor that allow its members to revise and reconfigure exclusionary and oppressive spatial forms.

AB - This article examines the ways in which Black lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) members of the Ballroom community create black queer space to contend with their spatial exclusion from and marginalization within public and private space in urban Detroit, Michigan. Existing in most urban centers throughout North America, Ballroom culture is a community and network of Black and Latina/o LGBT people. In this ethnography, I delineate the multiple functions of two mutually constitutive domains of Ballroom culture, kinship (the houses) and ritualized performance (the ball events). I use queer theories of geography and draw from Sonjah Stanley Niaah's notion of performance geography to examine the generative socio-spatial practices that Ballroom members deploy to forge alternative possibilities for Black LGBT life in Detroit. In many ways, members of the Ballroom community work to challenge and undo the alienating and oppressive realities of built environments in urban centers by undertaking the necessary social and performance labor that allow its members to revise and reconfigure exclusionary and oppressive spatial forms.

KW - black queer space

KW - kinship

KW - performance ethnography

KW - performance geography

KW - socio-spatial practices

KW - spatial marginalization

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84940344262&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84940344262&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/0966369X.2013.786688

DO - 10.1080/0966369X.2013.786688

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84940344262

VL - 21

SP - 489

EP - 507

JO - Gender, Place, and Culture

JF - Gender, Place, and Culture

SN - 0966-369X

IS - 4

ER -