Engaging parents in the family check-up in middle school: Longitudinal effects on family conflict and problem behavior through the high school transition

Mark J. Van Ryzin, Elizabeth A. Stormshak, Thomas J. Dishion

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

64 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Adolescence is a time of significant developmental change. During this period, levels of problem behavior that had been relatively innocuous may escalate in the company of peers, with simultaneous reductions in parental monitoring and involvement. In this article, we report the results of a randomized controlled trial of the Family Check-Up (FCU), a family-centered, school-based intervention designed to forestall the escalation of adolescent problem behavior by promoting and motivating skillful parenting through the transition to high school. Methods: In this study, 593 ethnically diverse families were randomized to be offered the FCU when their youth were in seventh and eighth grades of middle school. We used complier average causal effect analysis to examine change in family conflict, antisocial behavior, involvement with deviant peers, and alcohol use from sixth through ninth grades. Results: Analyses revealed that when compared with a matched control group, youths whose parents had engaged in the FCU demonstrated significantly lower rates of growth in family conflict (p =.052), antisocial behavior, involvement with deviant peers, and alcohol use. Discussion: Our results extend current research on the FCU and provide support for theory that links family conflict with a variety of youth problem behavior. These results and the extant research on the FCU suggest that traditional school-based service delivery models that focus on the individual child may benefit from a shift in perspective to engage parents and families.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)627-633
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
Volume50
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Family Conflict
Parents
Alcohols
Adolescent Behavior
School Health Services
Problem Behavior
Parenting
Research Design
Randomized Controlled Trials
Control Groups
Growth

Keywords

  • Adolescent behavior
  • Alcohol consumption
  • Family conflict
  • Peer group
  • Prevention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Engaging parents in the family check-up in middle school : Longitudinal effects on family conflict and problem behavior through the high school transition. / Van Ryzin, Mark J.; Stormshak, Elizabeth A.; Dishion, Thomas J.

In: Journal of Adolescent Health, Vol. 50, No. 6, 06.2012, p. 627-633.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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