Engaging (or not) in coalition politics: a case study of Black and Latinx community advocacy toward educational equity

Carrie Sampson, Dawn Demps, Sara Rodriguez-Martinez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The potential for cross-racial coalitions between minoritized communities in educational advocacy and policymaking is enhanced as communities become increasingly diverse. In this qualitative case study, we use interviews and archival data to explore coalition politics between Black and Latinx community leaders in a large, metropolitan school district in the U.S. Mountain West. Utilizing postcolonial feminist theory and critical race theory, we explore how and why Black and Latinx communities engage (or not) in coalition politics to advocate for educational equity. We found that although these communities rarely engaged in coalition politics, they sometimes developed what we termed micro-coalitions. This is a small, yet powerful and promising coalition grounded in a deep understanding of historical racial injustices and explicit efforts to navigate tensions and support both communities. We further highlight how district and state leaders leveraged existing tensions and adopted broadened but weakened policies to appease these communities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalRace Ethnicity and Education
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • Black/Brown
  • critical race theory
  • cross racial coalitions
  • postcolonial feminist theory
  • School boards
  • school districts
  • solidarity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Demography
  • Cultural Studies
  • Education

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