Energy performance of sustainable roofing systems

David Sailor, Prem Vuppuluri

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This study presents efforts to analyze how sustainable roofing technologies can contribute to the energy budget of buildings, and the resulting implications for heating and cooling energy use. The data analyzed in this study were obtained from a field experiment performed on a four story warehouse/office building in Portland, Oregon USA. The building's roof includes a 216 panel, 45.6 kW solar photovoltaic array in combination with 576 m 2 of vegetated green roofing. While most of the surface consists of green roof shaded by photovoltaic panels, the roof also has test patches of dark membrane, white membrane and un-shaded green-roofing. Interior and exterior surface temperatures were monitored over a period of two years and heat flux into the building is estimated using a finite difference conduction model. On average, the black roof membrane was the only roof that caused a net heat gain into the building in the summer. In the winter, all four roofing technologies resulted in net heat losses out of the building.. Both the PV-shaded and un-shaded green-roofs indicated a net heat loss out of the interior of the building during both the summer and winter. This latter effect is largely a result of green-roof evaporative cooling-which can benefit air conditioning demand in summer but may be undesirable during heating-dominated seasons

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationASME 2013 Heat Transfer Summer Conf. Collocated with the ASME 2013 7th Int. Conf. on Energy Sustainability and the ASME 2013 11th Int. Conf. on Fuel Cell Science, Engineering and Technology, HT 2013
Volume4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes
EventASME 2013 Heat Transfer Summer Conference, HT 2013 Collocated with the ASME 2013 7th International Conference on Energy Sustainability and the ASME 2013 11th International Conference on Fuel Cell Science, Engineering and Technology - Minneapolis, MN, United States
Duration: Jul 14 2013Jul 19 2013

Other

OtherASME 2013 Heat Transfer Summer Conference, HT 2013 Collocated with the ASME 2013 7th International Conference on Energy Sustainability and the ASME 2013 11th International Conference on Fuel Cell Science, Engineering and Technology
CountryUnited States
CityMinneapolis, MN
Period7/14/137/19/13

Fingerprint

Roofs
Membranes
Heat losses
Cooling
Heating
Office buildings
Warehouses
Air conditioning
Heat flux
Experiments

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Fluid Flow and Transfer Processes

Cite this

Sailor, D., & Vuppuluri, P. (2013). Energy performance of sustainable roofing systems. In ASME 2013 Heat Transfer Summer Conf. Collocated with the ASME 2013 7th Int. Conf. on Energy Sustainability and the ASME 2013 11th Int. Conf. on Fuel Cell Science, Engineering and Technology, HT 2013 (Vol. 4). [V004T13A002] https://doi.org/10.1115/HT2013-17535

Energy performance of sustainable roofing systems. / Sailor, David; Vuppuluri, Prem.

ASME 2013 Heat Transfer Summer Conf. Collocated with the ASME 2013 7th Int. Conf. on Energy Sustainability and the ASME 2013 11th Int. Conf. on Fuel Cell Science, Engineering and Technology, HT 2013. Vol. 4 2013. V004T13A002.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Sailor, D & Vuppuluri, P 2013, Energy performance of sustainable roofing systems. in ASME 2013 Heat Transfer Summer Conf. Collocated with the ASME 2013 7th Int. Conf. on Energy Sustainability and the ASME 2013 11th Int. Conf. on Fuel Cell Science, Engineering and Technology, HT 2013. vol. 4, V004T13A002, ASME 2013 Heat Transfer Summer Conference, HT 2013 Collocated with the ASME 2013 7th International Conference on Energy Sustainability and the ASME 2013 11th International Conference on Fuel Cell Science, Engineering and Technology, Minneapolis, MN, United States, 7/14/13. https://doi.org/10.1115/HT2013-17535
Sailor D, Vuppuluri P. Energy performance of sustainable roofing systems. In ASME 2013 Heat Transfer Summer Conf. Collocated with the ASME 2013 7th Int. Conf. on Energy Sustainability and the ASME 2013 11th Int. Conf. on Fuel Cell Science, Engineering and Technology, HT 2013. Vol. 4. 2013. V004T13A002 https://doi.org/10.1115/HT2013-17535
Sailor, David ; Vuppuluri, Prem. / Energy performance of sustainable roofing systems. ASME 2013 Heat Transfer Summer Conf. Collocated with the ASME 2013 7th Int. Conf. on Energy Sustainability and the ASME 2013 11th Int. Conf. on Fuel Cell Science, Engineering and Technology, HT 2013. Vol. 4 2013.
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