Energy metabolism, enzymatic flux capacities, and metabolic flux rates in flying honeybees

R. K. Suarez, J. R B Lighton, B. Joos, S. P. Roberts, Jon Harrison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

86 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Honeybees rely primarily on the oxidation of hexose sugars to provide the energy required for flight. Measurement of VCO2 (equal to VO2, because VCO2/VO2 = 1.0 during carbohydrate oxidation) during flight allowed estimation of steady-state flux rates through pathways of flight muscle energy metabolism. Comparison of V(max) values for flight muscle hexokinase, phosphofructokinase, citrate synthase, and cytochrome c oxidase with rates of carbon and O2 flux during flight reveal that these enzymes operate closer to V(max) in the flight muscles of flying honeybees than in other muscles previously studied. Possible mechanistic and evolutionary implications of these findings are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)12616-12620
Number of pages5
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume93
Issue number22
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 29 1996

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Energy Metabolism
Muscles
Carbon Cycle
Citrate (si)-Synthase
Phosphofructokinases
Hexokinase
Hexoses
Electron Transport Complex IV
Carbohydrates
Enzymes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • General

Cite this

Energy metabolism, enzymatic flux capacities, and metabolic flux rates in flying honeybees. / Suarez, R. K.; Lighton, J. R B; Joos, B.; Roberts, S. P.; Harrison, Jon.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 93, No. 22, 29.10.1996, p. 12616-12620.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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