Energy-filtered chemical mapping: Current applications to materials science

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Elemental mapping is a powerful technique for elucidating the distribution of elements on the nanometer scale in materials with complex morphologies. For many applications in materials science, it is important to sample a statistically meaningful area of the specimen under study. A conventional transmission electron microscope (TEM) equipped with an energy filter is suited to this requirement at intermediate resolution because the electron beam current is two orders of magnitude greater than that from a field electron gun (FEG) scanning TEM (STEM). Recent advances in spectrometer design and digital image recording have stimulated renewed interest in energy-filtered imaging and elemental mapping with a conventional TEM.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings - Annual Meeting, Microscopy Society of America
EditorsG.W. Bailey, A.J. Garratt-Reed
Pages958-959
Number of pages2
StatePublished - 1994
EventProceedings of the 52nd Annual Meeting of the Microscopy Society of America - New Orleans, LA, USA
Duration: Jul 31 1994Aug 5 1994

Other

OtherProceedings of the 52nd Annual Meeting of the Microscopy Society of America
CityNew Orleans, LA, USA
Period7/31/948/5/94

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

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    Crozier, P. (1994). Energy-filtered chemical mapping: Current applications to materials science. In G. W. Bailey, & A. J. Garratt-Reed (Eds.), Proceedings - Annual Meeting, Microscopy Society of America (pp. 958-959)