Abstract

Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cardiorespiratory response and energy expenditure during the practice of Tai Chi Easy (TCE). TCE has been proposed as a low-intensity alternative to traditional physical activity. Design: Oxygen cost data were collected from 10 healthy adult women (mean age of 47.9. ±. 12.8 years) at rest and during a 30-min session of TCE using an automated metabolic cart and heart rate (HR) telemetry. The Borg rating of perceived exertion (RPE) scale was utilized to measure subjective intensity of the TCE movements. Results: The mean oxygen consumption (VO2) for the movements ranged from 4.3mlkg-1min-1 to 5.5mlkg-1min-1 with an overall mean of 5.0mlkg-1min-1. The mean HR for all activity was 67.0 beats per minute and the mean energy expenditure (EE) was 1.6Kcalmin-1. Conclusions: Cardiorespiratory and EE responses to TCE indicate that this a low intensity exercise appropriate for individuals requiring activity prescriptions of approximately 2 metabolic equivalents (METs).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)802-805
Number of pages4
JournalComplementary Therapies in Medicine
Volume23
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2015

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Tai Ji
Energy Metabolism
Heart Rate
Metabolic Equivalent
Exercise
Telemetry
Oxygen Consumption
Prescriptions
Oxygen
Costs and Cost Analysis

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular responses
  • Energy expenditure
  • Physical activity
  • Tai Chi Easy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Complementary and alternative medicine
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing
  • Complementary and Manual Therapy

Cite this

Energy expenditure and cardiovascular responses to Tai Chi Easy. / Smith, Lisa L.; Wherry, Sarah J.; Larkey, Linda; Ainsworth, Barbara; Swan, Pamela.

In: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Vol. 23, No. 6, 01.12.2015, p. 802-805.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Smith, Lisa L. ; Wherry, Sarah J. ; Larkey, Linda ; Ainsworth, Barbara ; Swan, Pamela. / Energy expenditure and cardiovascular responses to Tai Chi Easy. In: Complementary Therapies in Medicine. 2015 ; Vol. 23, No. 6. pp. 802-805.
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