Energy-based crashworthiness optimization for multiple vehicle impacts

H. Fang, Kiran Solanki, M. F. Horstemeyer

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this paper, we use a full-scale finite element vehicle model of a 1996 Dodge Neon in simulating two types of vehicle crashes, offset-frontal and side impacts. Based on an analysis of the vehicle's histories of internal energy absorption under both impacts, we select twenty components as design variables in the optimization of the vehicle's weight without decreasing the vehicle's energy absorption capacity and energy absorption rate. We use the second-order polynomials in creating the metamodels for the response functions of energy absorption under both impacts. The optimization result shows a significant reduction on the total weight of the selected components. The LS-DYNA MPP v970 and a full-scale finite element vehicle model of 320,872 nodes and 577,524 elements are used in the simulations. A simulation of 100 ms offset-frontal impact takes approximately 17 hours with 36 processors on the IBM Linux SuperCluster, which has a total of 1038 Intel Pentium HI 1.266 GHz processors and 607.5 GB RAM. A simulation of 100 ms side impact takes approximately 29 hours with the same condition as the offset-frontal simulation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationTransportation 2004: Transportation and Environment
Pages11-16
Number of pages6
StatePublished - 2004
Externally publishedYes
Event2004 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE 2004 - Anaheim, CA, United States
Duration: Nov 13 2004Nov 19 2004

Other

Other2004 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE 2004
CountryUnited States
CityAnaheim, CA
Period11/13/0411/19/04

Fingerprint

Crashworthiness
Energy absorption
Neon
Random access storage
Polynomials

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Fang, H., Solanki, K., & Horstemeyer, M. F. (2004). Energy-based crashworthiness optimization for multiple vehicle impacts. In Transportation 2004: Transportation and Environment (pp. 11-16). [IMECE2004-59123]

Energy-based crashworthiness optimization for multiple vehicle impacts. / Fang, H.; Solanki, Kiran; Horstemeyer, M. F.

Transportation 2004: Transportation and Environment. 2004. p. 11-16 IMECE2004-59123.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Fang, H, Solanki, K & Horstemeyer, MF 2004, Energy-based crashworthiness optimization for multiple vehicle impacts. in Transportation 2004: Transportation and Environment., IMECE2004-59123, pp. 11-16, 2004 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE 2004, Anaheim, CA, United States, 11/13/04.
Fang H, Solanki K, Horstemeyer MF. Energy-based crashworthiness optimization for multiple vehicle impacts. In Transportation 2004: Transportation and Environment. 2004. p. 11-16. IMECE2004-59123
Fang, H. ; Solanki, Kiran ; Horstemeyer, M. F. / Energy-based crashworthiness optimization for multiple vehicle impacts. Transportation 2004: Transportation and Environment. 2004. pp. 11-16
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