Endorsing equity and applauding stay-at-home moms: How male voices on work-life reveal aversive sexism and flickers of transformation

Sarah Tracy, Kendra Dyanne Rivera

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

What can we learn about women's organizational challenges by talking to men about gender roles and work-life? We attend to this question through an interview study with male executives, providing a close interpretive analysis of their talk about employees, wives, children, the division of domestic labor, and work-life policy. The study illustrates how executives' tacit hesitancy about women's participation in organizational life is closely connected to preferred gendered relationships in the private sphere. The case reveals a story of meaning in movement-aversive sexism marked by flickers of transformation-demonstrating how talk can both reveal and disrupt enduring gender scripts, and why hearing male voices is integral to addressing women's work-life dilemmas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3-43
Number of pages41
JournalManagement Communication Quarterly
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2010

Fingerprint

sexism
equity
Personnel
women's work
Audition
gender role
wife
employee
labor
participation
gender
interview
Equity
Sexism

Keywords

  • Aversive sexism
  • Discourse
  • Gender
  • Organization
  • Scripts
  • Work-life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Strategy and Management
  • Communication

Cite this

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