Empathy Between Physician Assistant Students and Standardized Patients: Evidence of an Inflation Bias

Kory Floyd, Mark A lan Generous, Lou Clark, Albert Simon, Ian Mcleod

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE: Empathic communication with patients is an essential component of quality primary care. This study examines the ability of physician assistant (PA) students to communicate empathically in clinical interviews with standardized patients.

METHODS: In their first year of training, PA students conducted 3 clinical interviews with standardized patients over a 6-month period in 2014, during the second half of their didactic year. Each interview was evaluated for empathy by 4 individuals: the students themselves, their standardized patients, their clinical instructors, and third-party observers.

RESULTS: Students consistently rated their empathic abilities more favorably than did patients, clinical instructors, or observers, with mean differences ranging from 0.56 to 1.92 and averaging 1.09 on a 9-point scale. Students' evaluations were most dissimilar from those of patients (difference M = 1.12) and most similar to those of observers (difference M = 1.06). The assessments of all 4 raters varied over time: students rated themselves as significantly more empathic in April (time 2) than in July (time 3) of their didactic year. Patients rated students as significantly less empathic in January of the didactic year (time 1) than at time 2 and as significantly more empathic at time 2 than time 3. Instructors rated students as significantly less empathic at time 1 than at either time 2 or time 3. Finally, observers rated students as significantly more empathic at time 1 than at either time 2 or time 3.

CONCLUSIONS: PA students consistently overestimate their empathic abilities during their first year of training. Given the importance of empathy in clinical care, increased didactic efforts focused on developing and conveying empathy may be warranted in PA education.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)93-98
Number of pages6
JournalThe journal of physician assistant education : the official journal of the Physician Assistant Education Association
Volume26
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jun 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Physician Assistants
Economic Inflation
empathy
assistant
inflation
physician
Students
trend
evidence
student
didactics
Aptitude
instructor
Interviews
time
ability
interview
Quality of Health Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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Empathy Between Physician Assistant Students and Standardized Patients : Evidence of an Inflation Bias. / Floyd, Kory; Generous, Mark A lan; Clark, Lou; Simon, Albert; Mcleod, Ian.

In: The journal of physician assistant education : the official journal of the Physician Assistant Education Association, Vol. 26, No. 2, 01.06.2015, p. 93-98.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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