Emissions of acrolein and other aldehydes from biodiesel-fueled heavy-duty vehicles

Thomas Cahill, Robert A. Okamoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aldehyde emissions were measured from two heavy-duty trucks, namely 2000 and 2008 model year vehicles meeting different EPA emission standards. The tests were conducted on a chassis dynamometer and emissions were collected from a constant volume dilution tunnel. For the 2000 model year vehicle, four different fuels were tested, namely California ultralow sulfur diesel (CARB ULSD), soy biodiesel, animal biodiesel, and renewable diesel. All of the fuels were tested with simulated city and high speed cruise drive cycles. For the 2008 vehicle, only soy biodiesel and CARB ULSD fuels were tested. The research objective was to compare aldehyde emission rates between (1) the test fuels, (2) the drive cycles, and (3) the engine technologies. The results showed that soy biodiesel had the highest acrolein emission rates while the renewable diesel showed the lowest. The drive cycle also affected emission rates with the cruise drive cycle having lower emissions than the urban drive cycle. Lastly, the newer vehicle with the diesel particulate filter had greatly reduced carbonyl emissions compared to the other vehicles, thus demonstrating that the engine technology had a greater influence on emission rates than the fuels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)8382-8388
Number of pages7
JournalEnvironmental Science and Technology
Volume46
Issue number15
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 7 2012

Fingerprint

Acrolein
Biofuels
aldehyde
Aldehydes
diesel
Engines
Dynamometers
Chassis
engine
Sulfur
Trucks
Dilution
Tunnels
Animals
vehicle
dilution
tunnel
sulfur
filter
rate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry

Cite this

Emissions of acrolein and other aldehydes from biodiesel-fueled heavy-duty vehicles. / Cahill, Thomas; Okamoto, Robert A.

In: Environmental Science and Technology, Vol. 46, No. 15, 07.08.2012, p. 8382-8388.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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