Embers of society

Firelight talk among the Ju/'hoansi Bushmen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

84 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Much attention has been focused on control of fire in human evolution and the impact of cooking on anatomy, social, and residential arrangements. However, little is known about what transpired when firelight extended the day, creating effective time for social activities that did not conflict with productive time for subsistence activities. Comparison of 174 day and nighttime conversations among the Ju/'hoan (!Kung) Bushmen of southern Africa, supplemented by 68 translated texts, suggests that day talk centers on economic matters and gossip to regulate social relations. Night activities steer away from tensions of the day to singing, dancing, religious ceremonies, and enthralling stories, often about known people. Such stories describe the workings of entire institutions in a small-scale society with little formal teaching. Night talk plays an important role in evoking higher orders of theory of mind via the imagination, conveying attributes of people in broad networks (virtual communities), and transmitting the "big picture" of cultural institutions that generate regularity of behavior, cooperation, and trust at the regional level. Findings from the Ju/'hoan are compared with other hunter-gatherer societies and related to the widespread human use of firelight for intimate conversation and our appetite for evening stories. The question is raised as to what happens when economically unproductive firelit time is turned to productive time by artificial lighting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)14027-14035
Number of pages9
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume111
Issue number39
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 30 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Dancing
Southern Africa
Theory of Mind
Imagination
Singing
Cooking
Appetite
Lighting
Anatomy
Teaching
Economics
Conflict (Psychology)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Embers of society : Firelight talk among the Ju/'hoansi Bushmen. / Wiessner, Pauline.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 111, No. 39, 30.09.2014, p. 14027-14035.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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