Elevated salivary alpha amylase in adolescent sexual abuse survivors with posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms

Brooks R. Keeshin, Jeffrey R. Strawn, Dorothee Out, Douglas A. Granger, Frank W. Putnam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Little is known regarding neuroendocrine responses in adolescent girls with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) who have experienced sexual abuse. Therefore, we collected saliva samples three times daily for 3 days to assess concentrations of salivary alpha amylase (sAA) - a surrogate marker for autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity and, in particular, sympathetic activity - in sexually abused adolescent girls. Methods: Twenty-four girls (mean age: 15±1.4 years) who had experienced recent sexual abuse (i.e., sexual abuse occurred 1-6 months prior to study enrollment) and 12 healthy comparison subjects (mean age: 14.8±1.3 years) completed a structured interview and assessments to ascertain symptoms of posttraumatic stress, then collected saliva at home upon awakening, 30 minutes after waking, and at 5 p.m. on three consecutive school days. Results: For sexually abused girls, total PTSD symptoms were associated with higher overall morning levels of sAA (r[20]=0.51, p=0.02), a finding driven by intrusive symptoms (r[20]=0.43, p<0.05) and hyperarousal symptoms (r[20]=0.58, p=0.01). There were no significant differences in diurnal sAA secretion between the sexually abused girls and healthy comparison adolescents. Conclusions: Overall morning concentrations of sAA in sexually abused girls are associated with overall PTSD severity as well as symptoms of hyperarousal and intrusive symptoms, possibly reflecting symptom-linked increases in ANS tone. These data raise the possibility that alterations in ANS activity are related to the pathophysiology of sexual abuse-related PTSD in adolescent girls, and may inform therapeutic interventions (e.g., antiadrenergic medications).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)344-350
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2015

Fingerprint

Salivary alpha-Amylases
Sex Offenses
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
Survivors
Autonomic Nervous System
Saliva
Adrenergic Antagonists
Healthy Volunteers
Biomarkers
Interviews

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Elevated salivary alpha amylase in adolescent sexual abuse survivors with posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms. / Keeshin, Brooks R.; Strawn, Jeffrey R.; Out, Dorothee; Granger, Douglas A.; Putnam, Frank W.

In: Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology, Vol. 25, No. 4, 01.05.2015, p. 344-350.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Keeshin, Brooks R. ; Strawn, Jeffrey R. ; Out, Dorothee ; Granger, Douglas A. ; Putnam, Frank W. / Elevated salivary alpha amylase in adolescent sexual abuse survivors with posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms. In: Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology. 2015 ; Vol. 25, No. 4. pp. 344-350.
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