Electronics industry drivers of intermediation and disintermediation

Dan Shunk, Joseph R. Carter, John Hovis, Aditya Talwar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to summarize the current thinking on intermediation and disintermediation, extract candidate drivers for this cycle, capture the expert opinions on what is driving the cycle and determine the quantitative and qualitative conclusions related to the electronics industry supply network integration and requirements for its success. Design/methodology/approach - A series of one-on-one expert interviews were conducted to establish the validity of the initial list of drivers and to add to this list based upon their expert knowledge. A web-based survey followed with the purpose of validating the final dimensions list and assessing the various alternative value propositions that intermediaries should be considering. Finally, a Delphi exercise concluded this research thrust by convening experts in the electronics supply network for a one-day review of the results and a distillation of the results into expert forecasts of directions and trends. Findings - Any supply chain intermediary must achieve "Operational Excellence" in their chosen field of endeavor for them to remain competitive in the electronics industry. But this condition is a necessary but not sufficient predictor of business success. The intermediary service "Bundles" bring more value than individual cash flow, material flow, information flow or knowledge flow alone. And unbundling one flow from the others does not seem to provide a successful disintermediation platform. Practical implications - The paper provides electronics industry firms an assessment of the fundamental conclusions that must be addressed for this industry to better withstand another industry downturn than it did in the previous recessionary period (2001-2002). Originality/value - This paper documents the first triangulated research project where knowledgeable experts within the electronics industry supply network were polled to determine the fundamental drivers for the intermediation/disintermediation cycle present in the electronics industry today.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)248-261
Number of pages14
JournalInternational Journal of Physical Distribution and Logistics Management
Volume37
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2007

Fingerprint

electronics industry
Electronics industry
driver
expert
supply
business success
Values
Industry
expert knowledge
industry
information flow
Distillation
Supply chains
Electronic equipment
research project
candidacy
Intermediation
Disintermediation
electronics
firm

Keywords

  • Electronics industry
  • Integration
  • Supply chain management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)
  • Management Information Systems

Cite this

Electronics industry drivers of intermediation and disintermediation. / Shunk, Dan; Carter, Joseph R.; Hovis, John; Talwar, Aditya.

In: International Journal of Physical Distribution and Logistics Management, Vol. 37, No. 3, 2007, p. 248-261.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shunk, Dan ; Carter, Joseph R. ; Hovis, John ; Talwar, Aditya. / Electronics industry drivers of intermediation and disintermediation. In: International Journal of Physical Distribution and Logistics Management. 2007 ; Vol. 37, No. 3. pp. 248-261.
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