Abstract

Carbohydrates are one of the four main building blocks of life, and are categorized as monosaccharides (sugars), oligosaccharides and polysaccharides. Each sugar can exist in two alternative anomers (in which a hydroxy group at C-1 takes different orientations) and each pair of sugars can form different epimers (isomers around the stereocentres connecting the sugars). This leads to a vast combinatorial complexity, intractable to mass spectrometry and requiring large amounts of sample for NMR characterization. Combining measurements of collision cross section with mass spectrometry (IM-MS) helps, but many isomers are still difficult to separate. Here, we show that recognition tunnelling (RT) can classify many anomers and epimers via the current fluctuations they produce when captured in a tunnel junction functionalized with recognition molecules. Most importantly, RT is a nanoscale technique utilizing sub-picomole quantities of analyte. If integrated into a nanopore, RT would provide a unique approach to sequencing linear polysaccharides.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number13868
JournalNature Communications
Volume7
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 21 2016

Fingerprint

carbohydrates
sugars
Sugars
Isomers
Polysaccharides
Mass Spectrometry
isomers
Nanopores
Carbohydrates
Molecules
Monosaccharides
polysaccharides
Oligosaccharides
electronics
Mass spectrometry
molecules
mass spectroscopy
monosaccharides
sequencing
Tunnel junctions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Im, J. O., Biswas, S., Liu, H., Zhao, Y., Sen, S., Biswas, S., ... Zhang, P. (2016). Electronic single-molecule identification of carbohydrate isomers by recognition tunnelling. Nature Communications, 7, [13868]. https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms13868

Electronic single-molecule identification of carbohydrate isomers by recognition tunnelling. / Im, Jong One; Biswas, Sovan; Liu, Hao; Zhao, Yanan; Sen, Suman; Biswas, Sudipta; Ashcroft, Brian; Borges, Chad; Wang, Xu; Lindsay, Stuart; Zhang, Peiming.

In: Nature Communications, Vol. 7, 13868, 21.12.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Im, JO, Biswas, S, Liu, H, Zhao, Y, Sen, S, Biswas, S, Ashcroft, B, Borges, C, Wang, X, Lindsay, S & Zhang, P 2016, 'Electronic single-molecule identification of carbohydrate isomers by recognition tunnelling', Nature Communications, vol. 7, 13868. https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms13868
Im, Jong One ; Biswas, Sovan ; Liu, Hao ; Zhao, Yanan ; Sen, Suman ; Biswas, Sudipta ; Ashcroft, Brian ; Borges, Chad ; Wang, Xu ; Lindsay, Stuart ; Zhang, Peiming. / Electronic single-molecule identification of carbohydrate isomers by recognition tunnelling. In: Nature Communications. 2016 ; Vol. 7.
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AU - Biswas, Sudipta

AU - Ashcroft, Brian

AU - Borges, Chad

AU - Wang, Xu

AU - Lindsay, Stuart

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