Electronic cigarette policy recommendations: A scoping review

Benjamin R. Brady, Jennifer S. De La Rosa, Uma S. Nair, Scott Leischow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: There is a lack of consensus on whether e-cigarettes facilitate or threaten existing tobacco prevention strategies. This uncertainty is reflected in organizations’ conflicting e-cigarette position statements. We conducted a scoping review of position statements in published and gray literature to map the range and frequency of e-cigarette use recommendations. Methods: We collected 81 statements from international health organizations. Two coders independently performed qualitative content analysis to categorize e-cigarette recommendations. We explored differences based on organization type, geography, and the year recommendations were published. Results: We identified 5 recommendation types: encourage smokers to use e-cigarettes as a cessation aid or as an alternative source of nicotine (N = 5); support individuals who use e-cigarettes to quit smoking (N = 20); avoid using until more research is available (N = 19); restrict access based on available evidence (N = 30); and prohibit e-cigarette marketing and sale (N = 7). Conclusion: Organizations presented diverse e-cigarette use recommendations. The variation related to organizations’ differing tobacco prevention priorities and level of confidence in current e-cigarette research. These differences may create confusion. Additional research can examine whether this variability influences stakeholders’ attitudes or behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)8-104
Number of pages97
JournalAmerican Journal of Health Behavior
Volume43
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Tobacco Products
electronics
nicotine
Organizations
gray literature
sale
smoking
content analysis
Tobacco
marketing
confidence
stakeholder
uncertainty
geography
Research
organization
Electronic Cigarettes
lack
Confusion
Geography

Keywords

  • E-cigarette
  • Electronic cigarette
  • Scoping review
  • Smoking policy
  • Tobacco control

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Electronic cigarette policy recommendations : A scoping review. / Brady, Benjamin R.; De La Rosa, Jennifer S.; Nair, Uma S.; Leischow, Scott.

In: American Journal of Health Behavior, Vol. 43, No. 1, 01.01.2019, p. 8-104.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brady, Benjamin R. ; De La Rosa, Jennifer S. ; Nair, Uma S. ; Leischow, Scott. / Electronic cigarette policy recommendations : A scoping review. In: American Journal of Health Behavior. 2019 ; Vol. 43, No. 1. pp. 8-104.
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