eHealth literacy demands and cognitive processes underlying barriers in consumer health information seeking

Connie V. Chan, Jelena Mirkovic, Stephanie Furniss, David Kaufman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Consumer eHealth tools play an increasingly important role in engaging patients as participants in managing their health and seeking health information. However, there is a documented gap between the skill and knowledge demands of eHealth systems and user competencies to benefit from these tools. Objective: This research aims to reveal the knowledge- and skillrelated barriers to effective use of eHealth tools. Methods: We used a microanalytic framework for characterizing the different cognitive dimensions of eHealth literacy to classify task demands and barriers that 20 participants experienced while performing online information-seeking and decision-making tasks. Results: Participants ranged widely in their task performance across all 6 tasks as measured by task scores and types of barriers encountered. The highest performing participant experienced only 14 barriers whereas the lowest scoring one experienced 153. A more detailed analysis of two tasks revealed that the highest number of incorrect answers and experienced barriers were caused by tasks requiring: (a) Media literacy and Science literacy at high cognitive complexity levels and (b) a combination of Numeracy and Information literacy at different cognitive complexity levels. Conclusions: Applying this type of analysis enabled us to characterize task demands by literacy type and by cognitive complexity. Mapping barriers to literacy types provided insight into the interaction between users and eHealth tasks. Although the gap between eHealth tools, users' skills, and knowledge can be difficult to bridge, an understanding of the cognitive complexity and literacy demands can serve to reduce the gap between designer and consumer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)550-575
Number of pages26
JournalKnowledge Management and E-Learning
Volume7
Issue number4
StatePublished - Dec 1 2015

Fingerprint

consumer information
health information
literacy
Health
Decision making
Cognitive processes
Information seeking
Literacy
Health information
E-health
Cognitive complexity
decision making
interaction
science
health

Keywords

  • Cognition
  • Consumer health
  • eHealth
  • Information seeking
  • Task analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Management of Technology and Innovation

Cite this

eHealth literacy demands and cognitive processes underlying barriers in consumer health information seeking. / Chan, Connie V.; Mirkovic, Jelena; Furniss, Stephanie; Kaufman, David.

In: Knowledge Management and E-Learning, Vol. 7, No. 4, 01.12.2015, p. 550-575.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chan, Connie V. ; Mirkovic, Jelena ; Furniss, Stephanie ; Kaufman, David. / eHealth literacy demands and cognitive processes underlying barriers in consumer health information seeking. In: Knowledge Management and E-Learning. 2015 ; Vol. 7, No. 4. pp. 550-575.
@article{9345fcc0fc80460aa86f86244c2ce1f6,
title = "eHealth literacy demands and cognitive processes underlying barriers in consumer health information seeking",
abstract = "Background: Consumer eHealth tools play an increasingly important role in engaging patients as participants in managing their health and seeking health information. However, there is a documented gap between the skill and knowledge demands of eHealth systems and user competencies to benefit from these tools. Objective: This research aims to reveal the knowledge- and skillrelated barriers to effective use of eHealth tools. Methods: We used a microanalytic framework for characterizing the different cognitive dimensions of eHealth literacy to classify task demands and barriers that 20 participants experienced while performing online information-seeking and decision-making tasks. Results: Participants ranged widely in their task performance across all 6 tasks as measured by task scores and types of barriers encountered. The highest performing participant experienced only 14 barriers whereas the lowest scoring one experienced 153. A more detailed analysis of two tasks revealed that the highest number of incorrect answers and experienced barriers were caused by tasks requiring: (a) Media literacy and Science literacy at high cognitive complexity levels and (b) a combination of Numeracy and Information literacy at different cognitive complexity levels. Conclusions: Applying this type of analysis enabled us to characterize task demands by literacy type and by cognitive complexity. Mapping barriers to literacy types provided insight into the interaction between users and eHealth tasks. Although the gap between eHealth tools, users' skills, and knowledge can be difficult to bridge, an understanding of the cognitive complexity and literacy demands can serve to reduce the gap between designer and consumer.",
keywords = "Cognition, Consumer health, eHealth, Information seeking, Task analysis",
author = "Chan, {Connie V.} and Jelena Mirkovic and Stephanie Furniss and David Kaufman",
year = "2015",
month = "12",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "7",
pages = "550--575",
journal = "Knowledge Management and E-Learning",
issn = "2073-7904",
publisher = "University of Hong Kong",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - eHealth literacy demands and cognitive processes underlying barriers in consumer health information seeking

AU - Chan, Connie V.

AU - Mirkovic, Jelena

AU - Furniss, Stephanie

AU - Kaufman, David

PY - 2015/12/1

Y1 - 2015/12/1

N2 - Background: Consumer eHealth tools play an increasingly important role in engaging patients as participants in managing their health and seeking health information. However, there is a documented gap between the skill and knowledge demands of eHealth systems and user competencies to benefit from these tools. Objective: This research aims to reveal the knowledge- and skillrelated barriers to effective use of eHealth tools. Methods: We used a microanalytic framework for characterizing the different cognitive dimensions of eHealth literacy to classify task demands and barriers that 20 participants experienced while performing online information-seeking and decision-making tasks. Results: Participants ranged widely in their task performance across all 6 tasks as measured by task scores and types of barriers encountered. The highest performing participant experienced only 14 barriers whereas the lowest scoring one experienced 153. A more detailed analysis of two tasks revealed that the highest number of incorrect answers and experienced barriers were caused by tasks requiring: (a) Media literacy and Science literacy at high cognitive complexity levels and (b) a combination of Numeracy and Information literacy at different cognitive complexity levels. Conclusions: Applying this type of analysis enabled us to characterize task demands by literacy type and by cognitive complexity. Mapping barriers to literacy types provided insight into the interaction between users and eHealth tasks. Although the gap between eHealth tools, users' skills, and knowledge can be difficult to bridge, an understanding of the cognitive complexity and literacy demands can serve to reduce the gap between designer and consumer.

AB - Background: Consumer eHealth tools play an increasingly important role in engaging patients as participants in managing their health and seeking health information. However, there is a documented gap between the skill and knowledge demands of eHealth systems and user competencies to benefit from these tools. Objective: This research aims to reveal the knowledge- and skillrelated barriers to effective use of eHealth tools. Methods: We used a microanalytic framework for characterizing the different cognitive dimensions of eHealth literacy to classify task demands and barriers that 20 participants experienced while performing online information-seeking and decision-making tasks. Results: Participants ranged widely in their task performance across all 6 tasks as measured by task scores and types of barriers encountered. The highest performing participant experienced only 14 barriers whereas the lowest scoring one experienced 153. A more detailed analysis of two tasks revealed that the highest number of incorrect answers and experienced barriers were caused by tasks requiring: (a) Media literacy and Science literacy at high cognitive complexity levels and (b) a combination of Numeracy and Information literacy at different cognitive complexity levels. Conclusions: Applying this type of analysis enabled us to characterize task demands by literacy type and by cognitive complexity. Mapping barriers to literacy types provided insight into the interaction between users and eHealth tasks. Although the gap between eHealth tools, users' skills, and knowledge can be difficult to bridge, an understanding of the cognitive complexity and literacy demands can serve to reduce the gap between designer and consumer.

KW - Cognition

KW - Consumer health

KW - eHealth

KW - Information seeking

KW - Task analysis

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85000774334&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85000774334&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 7

SP - 550

EP - 575

JO - Knowledge Management and E-Learning

JF - Knowledge Management and E-Learning

SN - 2073-7904

IS - 4

ER -